Copples in the News — Sam and Libby get married

This is the wedding notice of my great-great grandparents, Samuel Adams Englehart and Libby Copple (here listed as Libby Jewell). I posted about Sam here. He was 26 in December 1878 when he married Libby Jewell at the home of her adoptive mother, Mrs. Polly Esther (Keeler) (Jewell) (Fike) Rose.

Libby was 17 years old on her wedding day. She was born in Mendocino County, California in 1861 to Ben Franklin Copple and his wife Phoebe (Harvey) Copple, who died in childbirth or very soon after Libby was born. But that’s a story for another post.

“Married: Englehart-Jewell,” Healdsburg Enterprise (Healdsburg, California), 26 Dec 1878, pg 2, col 1; digital images, California Digital Newspaper Collection, (http://cdnc.ucr.edu : accessed 3 Sep 2020).

Copples in the News – Pink Carnations for the bride

Lucile McDonald, a native of Collin County, Texas, married Earl Harold Copple in Kerr County, Texas (in what is known as the Texas Hill Country) on 17 February, 1941. She was 24 years old.

Her husband Earl was 32 years old and also a Texas native, being from Kimble County (adjacent to Kerr.) Earl was one of 10 children and the youngest son born to Virgil O. and Rosa (McDonald) Copple. Earl may be related to me twice over, as his paternal grandparents were cousins in some degree.

The bride was married in blue, with a corsage of pink carnations.

“McDonald-Copple Marriage Solemnized,” Kerrville Mountain Sun (Kerrville, Texas), 20 Feb 1941, pg 2, col 3; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 21 June 2020).

Beulah Copple marries Sam Long

Beulah Elaine Copple, daughter of Henry Ellis Copple and Julia (Williams) Copple was possibly my 4th cousin 4 times removed (a descendant of Nicholas Copple who died in 1808 in Rowan County, NC, and his wife).   

Beulah was born in 1892 in South Carolina, married Rev. Samuel Long in 1916, and had two sons.  She died at the age of 50.

The wedding notice ran to two columns, and was quite detailed about what the bridal party wore.  Here is only the first column. 

Beulah Copple m Sam Long

“Monroe [Beulah Copple marries Sam Long],” The News and Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina), 3 Sep 1916, pg 7, col 6; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 31 August 2020).

Copples in the News – James Copple wed Mary Harmsen

This marriage was between James Lowry Copple, whom I believe to be my 3rd cousin 5 times removed, and his second wife Mary Harmsen in 1923 in Iowa City, Iowa.

Harmsen_Copple 1923 Nuptials

James Lowry Copple was the son of Albert and Isabella (London) Copple.  He was one of 5 known children of theirs.  He was born in 1870 in Indiana and thus was hardly “young” by 1923, although his bride (second wife) was 17 years younger.

James worked as a farmer, and married his first wife around 1906.  They had one son, who died as an infant, before 1910.  After his first wife died in 1920, James remarried in 1923 to Mary Harmsen, whose father, Garrett, was born in Holland.

JamesLowryCopple_FamilyTree

 

“Copple-Harmsen,” Iowa City Press-Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa), 25 Aug 1923, pg 17, col 3;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copples in the News — Thelma Irene gets married

Thelma Irene (Copple) Selsor (1910 – 1995) was born either in Missouri, or in West Frankfort, Illinois, to Gaither Calvin Copple (1878 – 1947) and Eva (Martin) Copple (b. 1888).  She was born 18 April, a few days after the official 1910 census date, but a few days before her neighborhood was enumerated.  A child named “Myrtle” was listed as aged 1/12 (presumably 1 month old) in the household. [1] Could that be Thelma?

As indicated in the article, Thelma Irene married Lawrence Marion Selsor  (1911-1972) in Jonesboro on July 24, 1942.   Thelma worked at the (local?) air base, while Lawrence was with the Works Project Administration.  They took a honeymoon to Memphis, Tennessee. 

A quick search for Thelma Selsor on Ancestry’s page for U.S. city directories (1822 – 1995)  seems to indicate that the Selsors made their home in Jonesboro, Arkansas, after they married.

I did not do enough research on Thelma to determine if she had children.  However, it appears her paternal grandparents were Levi and Malinda (Dobbs) Copple and her great-grandparents were William and Abigail (Handley) Copple.  William’s parents were both Copples, being cousins to each other, and Thelma was likely my 4th cousin 3 times removed.

Thelma Irene Gets Married

“Selsor-Copple Rites are Performed Here,” The Courier News (Blytheville, Arkansas), 31 Jul 1942, page 2, column 1; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 September 2019)

[1] 1910 U.S. census, New Madrid County, Missouri,  population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 108, Hough, page 2B, family 43, Gaither [indexed as Garther] Copple household; digital images, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/ 1910uscenindex/: accessed 18 Oct 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T624, roll 802.

Copples in the News — Grant Copple marries Laura Shay

Grant Milton Copple was likely my 4th cousin 3 times removed.  He was the son of William Linton Copple and Lenora (Stough) Copple, both Iowa natives.

Laura Olive Shay was the daughter of Harry Shay, a native of England, and Olive Hill, a native of Rock County, Illinois.

Sadly, their marriage lasted only 7-1/2 years, ending with Laura’s death at the age of approximately 27 years.  She was survived by her husband Grant, and by their three young children.

Shay-Copple

“Shay – Copple,” The Daily Times (Davenport, Iowa), 20 Jul 1920, pg 17, col 5;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

Copples in the News – Maggie gets married

Margaret “Maggie” Copple (1861 – 1929) was the daughter of Samuel Copple and Mary Ann Rhoades.  Mary Ann herself had Copple blood, being the daughter of David D Rhoades and Celia Copple.  She is related to me on 3 lines: her maternal grandmother’s line (Copple), her father’s paternal grandfather’s line (Copple, obviously) and her father’s paternal grandmother’s line (Wright).

She and her family moved to Mendocino County, California during the 1870s, and married Samuel Duncan in Nov 1881 in Cloverdale, Sonoma County, California.  They would have 5 children, per the 1900 Federal Census, but only two would outlive Maggie.

Copple-Duncan

“Local Items,” Cloverdale Reveille (Cloverdale, California), 26 Nov 1881, pg 5, col 2;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 21 Sept 2019)

1900 U.S. census, Mendocino County, California, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 75, Sanel, page 3, dwelling 51, Samuel Duncan household; digital images, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1900usfedcen/: accessed 23 Sep 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T623, roll 93.

 

 

Copples in the News — A Marriage in Spokane, Washington

My extended Copple family apparently reached nearly every Western state, including California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Idaho and Arizona.  This article is about the upcoming wedding of Edward Clifton Copple (c 1879 – 1935) and his bride Olive Isham (1872 – 1956).

A little searching on Ancestry.com points to Edward Copple being the son of Abraham A and Marguerite Mahala (Fimple) Copple.  Edward’s great-grandparents were Jacob [Peter] Copple (c 1757 – 1821) and [Mary?] Elizabeth Garren [or Pfoutz], who are my 6th great-grandparents.

EdwardCliftonCopple_Marriage

“Michigan Girl Spokane Bride,” Spokane Chronicle (Washington) 11 May 1909, pg 6, col 7;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019)

Copples in the News — Bride of a Day goes to Prison

This story, apparently taking place in Logansport, Cass County, Indiana, is so lurid it doesn’t need an introduction.

But I did do some light searching to find out more about whether these people might be related to my own Copple line… more below.

Jessie Mary Copple Killed

Mrs. Mary [sic] Copple was apparently Junie May Harper born circa 1884, and married to a Charles Copple, born in Aug 1884 or 1885 in Missouri.  They had two girls, and had been married about 6 years at the time of her murder.  Charles was, over the years, alternately listed as mulatto or as black in the federal censuses.  Junie May (Harper) Copple was listed as white.

 

“Bride of a Day is Sent to Prison,” Spokane Chronicle (Spokane, Washington) 7 Dec 1912, pg 13, col 3; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 Sep 2019)

1910 U.S. census, Cass County, Indiana, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 26, Logansport Ward 3, page 5A, dwelling 512, Charles Copple household; digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1910uscenindex/ : accessed 22 Sep 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication M624, roll 342.

Lucas County, Ohio, Charles Copple – Olive Moore, 2 July 1923; “Ohio, County Marriage Records, 1774-1993,” Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/fsmarriageohio/ : accessed 21 Sep 2019) > Lucas > 1920-1926 > img 70.

 

 

 

Throwback Thursdays #tbt #wedding – My Parents

These photos were taken on my parents’ wedding day in 1957, at the home of my maternal grandfather.  The first one, clearly discolored due to its age and the nature of the film, is of my dad and mom, and their attendants.  Dad’s best man, George Francis McGrath (1934-1960), is on the far left.  Mom’s maid-of-honor, in blue (though it’s not obvious in this photo!), was her friend Jane (Sommerfeld) Stroth (1934-2011).  Mom and Jane met in nursing school; Jane would marry Jan Sroth the following year.

15Jun1957_MomWedding1

Dad and George were best friends, having gone to high school together — and possibly college (?).    George later joined the military and was doing training exercises at NAS Corpus Christi — flying — when his plane crashed and he died in January 1960.  My grandfather, who was informed, chose not to tell my dad (who was studying for his doctorate up in Michigan) because Grandpa didn’t want Dad to take time away from his studies to come back to San Francisco for the funeral.   (Not cool, Gramps!  Not cool at all.)

In the photo below, it’s a bit more obvious that Jane was wearing blue — even so, the color has faded significantly since I was a child.  It used to be evident that she wore a forget-me-not blue — with matching blue shoes.

MomWeddingDay_withGrandpa

This last picture was one I had printed from a slide about 30 years ago, so the color is richer, but still fading.  I don’t know everybody in the picture, but can name some folks:

15Jun1957_MomWedding5

From left to right — the first 3 people I don’t know.  Wearing a navy blue dress is my grand-aunt Anita (Colbert) Foley (Dad’s maternal aunt).  Behind her is her husband “Bud” Foley.  Next to them are my dad’s parents Cassius Dempsey and Margaret (Colbert) Dempsey.  Then, my dad and my mom.  On my mom’s left, wearing a hat and flowered dress is my dad’s sister Peggy.  Next to her, in the belted dress, is my mom’s cousin Rita Diamantine.  Behind Rita to her left are maid-of-honor Jane (Sommerfeld) Stroth and best man George McGrath.

What strikes me in going through these photos is how casual it all was.  The reception is my grandparents’ backyard.  Sandwiches, punch, wedding cake, and coffee was all that was on the menu.  Contrast that today with, say, the destination wedding!  Times change, don’t they?