Throwback Thursdays #tbt #wedding – My Parents

These photos were taken on my parents’ wedding day in 1957, at the home of my maternal grandfather.  The first one, clearly discolored due to its age and the nature of the film, is of my dad and mom, and their attendants.  Dad’s best man, George Francis McGrath (1934-1960), is on the far left.  Mom’s maid-of-honor, in blue (though it’s not obvious in this photo!), was her friend Jane (Sommerfeld) Stroth (1934-2011).  Mom and Jane met in nursing school; Jane would marry Jan Sroth the following year.

15Jun1957_MomWedding1

Dad and George were best friends, having gone to high school together — and possibly college (?).    George later joined the military and was doing training exercises at NAS Corpus Christi — flying — when his plane crashed and he died in January 1960.  My grandfather, who was informed, chose not to tell my dad (who was studying for his doctorate up in Michigan) because Grandpa didn’t want Dad to take time away from his studies to come back to San Francisco for the funeral.   (Not cool, Gramps!  Not cool at all.)

In the photo below, it’s a bit more obvious that Jane was wearing blue — even so, the color has faded significantly since I was a child.  It used to be evident that she wore a forget-me-not blue — with matching blue shoes.

MomWeddingDay_withGrandpa

This last picture was one I had printed from a slide about 30 years ago, so the color is richer, but still fading.  I don’t know everybody in the picture, but can name some folks:

15Jun1957_MomWedding5

From left to right — the first 3 people I don’t know.  Wearing a navy blue dress is my grand-aunt Anita (Colbert) Foley (Dad’s maternal aunt).  Behind her is her husband “Bud” Foley.  Next to them are my dad’s parents Cassius Dempsey and Margaret (Colbert) Dempsey.  Then, my dad and my mom.  On my mom’s left, wearing a hat and flowered dress is my dad’s sister Peggy.  Next to her, in the belted dress, is my mom’s cousin Rita Diamantine.  Behind Rita to her left are maid-of-honor Jane (Sommerfeld) Stroth and best man George McGrath.

What strikes me in going through these photos is how casual it all was.  The reception is my grandparents’ backyard.  Sandwiches, punch, wedding cake, and coffee was all that was on the menu.  Contrast that today with, say, the destination wedding!  Times change, don’t they?

 

 

 

Book Review: New Church Records Book!

This book sounds like something I need to look into! U.S. church records are not something I’ve generally looked at…

Genealogy Pants

ChurchRecordsBookI have recently had the privilege to read and review the new book How to Find Your Family History in U.S. Church Records: A Genealogist’s Guide by Sunny Jane Morton and Harold A. Henderson, CG (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2019). Back in 2015 I attended the course “Problem Solving with Church Records” at the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP) with Rev. David McDonald, CG as the instructor. It was a fantastic course (highly recommend!) and I have used the information from that course time and again but have longed to have a text with the information learned laid out in a concise manual. This book is the answer!

The book has two parts, the first is methodological and the second addresses twelve different denominations: Anglican/Episcopal, Baptist, Congregational, Dutch Reformed/Reformed Church in America, German Churches: Reformed and Sectarian, Latter-Day Saint (Mormon), Lutheran, Mennonite and Amish, Methodist, Quaker (Religious Society of…

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Throwback Thursdays #tbt #wedding – My Maternal Grandparents

This photo is of my mother’s parents on their wedding day in Healdsburg, Sonoma, California on 22 November 1934.  My grandmother Elizabeth was just 20 years old (as of June that year) and my grandfather James was also 20 (as of October that year).

I believe they are standing in front of my great-grandparents’ house off Dry Creek Road, just west of Healdsburg.  The house was originally built by my great-great granddad Peter Holst after he and his wife Caroline and little girl Annie arrived in the area circa 1877 from where they had lived in Connecticut.

Throwback Thursdays #tbt #wedding – Marie (Colbert) O’Donnell, my grand-aunt

Here is another wedding photo from my files.  This photo dates from 1931, when my paternal grandmother’s older sister Hanora Marie Colbert married Philip O’Donnell in San Francisco, California.

I have not requested a copy of Aunt Marie’s marriage certificate, but I have found, on familysearch.org, the index to Brides married in San Francisco County in 1931.  She and  Philip A. O’Donnell tied the knot on 29 August 1931 [1].

MarieColbertWedding_withConnieSiblings

From left to right, ladies first:  Margaret Colbert (later, Dempsey)  (1908-1983) , my grandmother and youngest sister of Marie; unknown woman; the bride, Hanora Marie (Colbert) O’Donnell (1902-1999); Anita (Colbert) Foley (1903-1996).

From left to right, the men:  Cassius Patrick Dempsey (1904-1993), my grandfather; unknown man; the groom, Philip A. O’Donnell (1901-1961); John Francis Foley (1902-1986); William C. “Babe” Colbert, the only brother of the bride (1910-1999).

Anita and John were married in San Francisco on 23 April 1927 [2].

 

 

[1] Marriage Certificate index (brides); digital images, ” California, San Francisco County Records, 1824-1997,” FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/1402856 : accessed 31 July 2019) > Marriages > Marriage Certificate Index (Brides), Vol. 27, 1931 > image 40.

[2] Marriage Certificate index (brides); digital images, ” California, San Francisco County Records, 1824-1997,” FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/1402856 : accessed 1 August 2019) > Marriages > Marriage Certificate Index (Brides), Vol. 23, 1927 > image 39.

Throwback Thursdays #tbt #wedding – James Diamantini and his brothers

To pick up again on my Throwback Thursdays, I’ll continue with my Italian (maternal) side.

This photo is from 1976, when one of my uncles got married.  James Diamantini (aka Diamantine) is with his wife, Jean (Champi) Diamantine (parents of the groom), and also with his two older brothers, Gilbert and Frank and their wives.

Grandpa and his brothers and their wives

From left to right, Gilbert Diamantini (1904 – 1984; born in Sant’Elpidio A Mare, Ascoli Piceno, Marche, Italy), his wife Eleanor (Wold) Diamantine (1918 – 1981); Frank Diamantini (1909 – 1997; born in California), his wife Eva (Rose) Diamantini (1901 – 1989); Jean (Champi) Diamantine (1915 – 2016), and James Diamantini (1914 – 1995).

 

My DNA Traits at 23andMe (v3)… how accurate are they?

I rarely look at my traits and health data on 23andMe, but after reading Roberta Estes’ post the other day, I thought I would take a look at my own traits and see which predictions are accurate and which are less so.

Below is the first page, and on the whole, it’s accurate.  Yes, I can taste bitter — but I like it!

23andMe_Blog1

Here is the second page of traits.  These are less accurate, especially about the hair color!

23andMe_Traits2

I intend to do a separate post on the issue of red hair.  I suspect hair color (and eye color, for that matter) is more complicated than what I originally learned in sophomore biology class, long before the human genome was decoded.

Have you tested at 23andMe?  And, if so, did you find your predicted traits to be fairly accurate — or not so much?

Throwback Thursdays #tbt – Christian Fredson and family

Christian Alfred Fredson (aka Chris) was one of my relatives on my Danish side, related to me through my maternal grandmother’s father.  In fact, my great-grandpa Charlie Holst was a first cousin of Chris.

In this photo, on the front porch of their home in Geyserville, Sonoma County, California — I do not know if the house is still standing — Chris is the young man on the left.  He was born in 1891, a few years after my great-grandfather, and is probably in his late 20’s in this photo.

His mother, Sophie (Thomsen) Fredson is to Chris’ left.  Sophie was my great-grandfather Charlie’s maternal aunt, a younger sister of Caroline (Thomsen) Holst.  Sophie was born in 1860 in the Danish duchy of Slesvig, just a few years before Bismarck invaded, and that land became part of what is now Germany.  (Sophie died in 1924; therefore this photo was taken no later than that year.)

Fredson2400dpi

Seated on the steps is Chris’ wife Geneva (Eagle)Fredson (1891-1973).  Next to Geneva is their first-born son, Leonard, who was born in 1914, and looks to be about 2 years old (so the photo was likely taken around 1916.)

Behind Geneva and Leonard are 3 older adults.  I am presuming that the man with white whiskers and the woman are Geneva’s parents, but cannot confirm that.  The man wearing suspenders and seated in what might be a rocking chair is Israel Fredson.  He was Chris’s dad, born in Sweden (somewhere!) in 1850.

Chris Fredson had an older sister, Hilda, who never married, and an older brother Charles, who had one daughter.  Chris and Geneva had 3 children: the aforementioned Leonard, a daughter Anna (1918-1925), and a son Donald (1919-2007).

Triangulation vs. “In Common With”

This question came up in one of the posts in Blaine Bettinger’s Facebook Group Genetic Genealogy Tips & Techniques, so I thought I’d give a quick example here that I refer to myself when I get confused.

A man with 3 children, who have all tested, has a match to a 2nd cousin (documented through now through both DNA and traditional genealogy).  He and the 2nd cousin share 11 segments of DNA.

It so happens that all 11 of those segments have passed down to those 3 children, which you can see in the illustration below.  Of those 11 segments shared by their father and his 2nd cousin, Child 1 inherited 4 segments.  Child 2 also inherited 4 segments — but an entirely different four segments than Child 1.  Child 3 inherited 7 of the 11 segments.

The inheritance and sharing is illustrated below, in data pulled from GedMatch.

Inheritance

For purposes of illustration, we’re setting aside the fact that generally, when triangulating to find a common ancestor, we don’t use two full-blooded siblings as 2 of the triangle legs; they are too closely related, and will triangulate on many segments.

That said, Child 1, Child 2 and their 2nd cousin once removed (2C1R) have DNA in common with each other, but no triangulated segments with their 2C1R.  This is because Child 1 shares DNA with 2C1R on chr 6, on chr 12 and 2 segments on chr 15, while Child 2 shares DNA with 2C1R

Child 1, Child 3 and their 2C1R have 3 triangulated segments: on chr 6, on chr 12, and 1 segment of chr 15.

Child 2, Child 3 and their 2C1R also have 3 triangulated segments: on chr 4, on chr 8, and on chr 18.

*******
And that is a quick overview of triangulation vs. in common with.

 

 

Throwback Thursdays #tbt – Maria Donini First Communion

I love this First Communion photo!  It’s labeled as “Maria Donini”.  To be honest, I don’t know exactly who she is!   But the photo could be dated anywhere from, say, the 1920s to the 1940s (?)

However, I do have some clues.  My great-grandmother, Maria (Bolognesi) Diamantini, had a younger sister Annuziata (born c. 1879 – died c. 1949), who married a man by the last name of Donini.  (Sadly, I don’t know the name of Mr. Donini.) 

I also know the Bolognesi family came from Sant’Elpidio A Mare, in the province of Fermo, in the region of Marche.  Perhaps the Donini family did too?

donini_maria

If you might know who the Donini family is, or who Maria Donini is, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

 

The Shared cM Project: Tracking individual contributions

Do you know about Blaine Bettinger’s Shared cM Project?  It’s the crowd-sourced collection of shared centiMorgans (cMs) for the purpose of analyzing the ranges of cMs found at different levels of relationship (full siblings, half 1st cousins, 2nd cousins, etc.)

If you and your known relatives have done your DNA tests at any of the big vendors, you can submit your data here.  Relationship is asked for, but no identifying information (except your email) is needed for submission.

I have been submitting my own DNA data since 2016 — Blaine released the first results in May 2015.   However, so that I won’t skew the results (with duplicate or triplicate submissions), I keep track of my submissions in my own Excel spreadsheet.  A sample of the page I use is below, filtered on just some of the 2C1R relationships I have submitted.  (I have hidden the names of the two testers involved in each relationship.)

Submission_Shared cM Project

Note that the cM range for my submissions of 2nd cousin 1 removed is from 32 cM to 267 cM.  The vast majority of relatives at this level were known beforehand, or otherwise targeted tests.  In the case of the tester who only shares 32 cM, they share that cM with one of 1st cousins.  The rest of us — my siblings and I — and my 1st cousin’s siblings share a much more “typical” amount of DNA with the tester, around 110 – 140 cM.  And since we all match at the full-sibling level, and at the full 1st cousin level, it (so far!) appears that the 32 cM is just due to the randomness of DNA inheritance.

One thing I did in the beginning was submit a relationship for each vendor.  (My father, for example, has tested at 23andMe, FTDNA, and Ancestry, as have I.)  So, originally, I submitted 3 different sets of father/daughter data.  (Obviously, the cM count varied in only minor amounts.)

Since mid-2017, though, I only submit once no matter how many places the two testers have tested at.  (Blaine does ask for the vendor name when you submit.)

In general, I have said no endogamy — but that is based on what I know of the relationship.  Who knows?  With enough research on certain lines, I may find that indeed there was endogamy.

I also, for my own interest, track “expected” DNA shared with actual DNA shared (assuming grandparents and uncles/aunts share an average of 25% with the tester, first cousins share an average of 12.5%, 1st cousins removed (1C1R) 6.25% and 2nd cousins 3.13%.)  It never fails to amaze me how my sister, brother and I have such variations in the amount of cM shared with a given targeted cousin.

How do you track your submissions, if you are submitting to the Shared cM Project?  Are you concerned with not submitting twice — or do you figure it will all average out in the end (certainly a possibility)?

Cite/link to this post: Cathy M. Dempsey, “The Shared cM Project: Tracking individual contributions” Genes and Roots, posted 31 Mar 2019 (https://genesandroots.com : accessed (date)).