Copples in the News — Little Clifford dies during the 1918 epidemic, but not from influenza

In the midst of this current coronavirus epidemic, I wondered if any of my distant Copple kin had suffered from influenza during the 1918 pandemic.  I know my great-grandmother’s brother, George Englehart, was a victim of the 1918 flu; his mother was a Copple.  But that’s a separate story.

A search on newspapers.com brought up little 8 year old Clifford Copple dying in Nov 1918 in Coos Bay, Oregon.  He was my 4th cousin 3 times removed, twice over.  Born to William Alonzo and Frances R (Center) Copple, he had two sisters and four brothers.  A number of his paternal extended family lived in the area, originally coming to Oregon by way of Washington, Illinois, Missouri and Indiana.

Clifford apparently suffered from influenza in the fall of 1918 — which would have been during the “second wave“.  (So it is quite possible — but unknown — if members of his family had it as well.)  However, he recovered, and then came down with meningitis, which was fatal to him.

Little Cliff’s death (and possible illness of other family members) probably wreaked havoc on William and Frances’ marriage.  As of the 1920 census (on April 1st), Frances was living with her children and her marital status was listed as “widowed” (although William did not die until 1928).  By May 1920, Frances had married James Weaver Cole.

CliffCoppleDies1918

Clifford’s great-great grandparents were Jacob [Peter] and Elizabeth (Wright) Copple.  Jacob Jr. was the son of Jacob [Peter] Copple and Mary Elizabeth Garren [or Foutz?], who are also my ancestors.

Elizabeth (Wright) Copple was the daughter of Benjamin Wright and Barbara Morgan.  Benjamin was the son of Richard Wright and Ann [unknown surname], who are also my ancestors.

 

“Son of W.M. Copple Dies,” The World (Coos Bay, Oregon), 16 Nov 1918, pg 6, col 1;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 March 2020)

Copples in the News – Glenn Copple appointed deputy DA

Glenn Copple (1888 – 1965) was appointed Deputy to Yuma County (Arizona) District Attorney Henry C. Kelly.

Glenn was born in Nov 1888 in Centralia, Illinois to Silas Bryan & Julia (Roper) Copple, who married in 1884.  He was their second son.  Silas Bryan Copple’s paternal great-grandparents were Jacob [Peter] Copple and [Mary] Elizabeth Garren [Pfoutz?], who are my 6th great-grandparents.

Glenn was in the military from Aug 1917 to July 1919, and after arriving home back in Centralia, was a lawyer.  He moved to Yuma, Arizona prior to January 1925, which is when he became the assistant District Attorney.

He married Janet Anne Burnell in 1934 in Phoenix, Maricopa County, and they had a son Gordon Burnell in April 1936 in Los Angeles County, California.  The family was back in Yuma County, Arizona as of the 1940 census.  Glenn died in Oct 1965, presumably in Arizona, but is buried in San Diego County, California.  His widow died in 1982, and his son Gordon died in 1987 at the age of 51.

Glenn was my 3rd cousin 4 times removed.

Glenn Copple Promoted to Asst DA

 

“Attorney Glen Copple is Named,” The Morning Sun (Yuma, Arizona), 2 Jan 1925, pg 1, col 6; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 13 January 2020).

 

 

 

Copples in the News – James Copple came to Logansport, Indiana

James Garfield Copple may be my 3rd cousin 5 times removed.   He was born either in Sep 1882 (according to the 1900 census) or on 8 Sep 1883 (according to the Draft Registration he filled out for World War I) or on 8 Sep 1884 (according to the Draft Registration he filled out for WWII).  

His parents were Lemon Copple (c 1837 – c 1888) and Elizabeth (Daniels) Copple, who married in 1865 in Douglas County, Kansas.  He married Jeanette Thomassen by 1916, when they were both living in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  (The article below references the fact that he was a Tulsa businessman.)  By 1920, he and his wife had 2 children, and were living in Indiana.  As of 1930, when this article was published and during the census enumeration, the family was living in Cass County, Indiana, which is where Logansport is.  Some time after 1942, he and his wife had moved to Tucson, Arizona, where he died in 1949.

James’ father, Lemon, was likely the son of Jacob Copple and Malinda Everman.  After that, it gets unclear.  There are numerous Jacob Copples and John Copples (the possible grandfather of Lemon) which are not clearly sorted out by most Ancestry.com users.  But many Ancestry trees have Lemon in Illinois or Indiana, whereas he was clearly — at least according to the Federal Census records — in Kansas.

James G Copple in LogansportIndiana

 

“How Did you Happen to Come to Logansport,” Logansport Pharos-Tribune (Logansport, Indiana), 9 May 1930, pg 4, col 4; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 27 Dec 2019).

Copples in the News – Flora’s Roses

 

Flora (Young) Copple (1869 – 1954), the wife of Claude Eugene Copple  — likely my 3rd cousin 4 times removed — of Hood River, Oregon, was apparently fond of roses.  I clipped this article thinking that her rose bushes must have been a sight to see.  But it turns out that, rather than having a green thumbs, she was in fact, skilled in paper artistry!  (Check out the third paragraph!)

The_Hood_River_Glacier_Thu__May_8__1919_

 

“Mrs. Copple’s Roses Attract Visitors,” The Hood River Glacier (Hood River, Oregon), 8 May 1919, pg 1, col 2; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 3 December 2019)

Copples in the News — Estate of Sam Copple (1824 – 1852)

This newspaper clipping appears to be about the estate of the late Samuel Copple (c 1824 – c 1852) of Marion County, Illinois.  Samuel was one of at least 11 children born to David [Allen] Copple & Lavina Huckleberry who resided in Marion County, IL late in their lives.  David was likely the son of Jacob [Peter] Copple and [Mary] Elizabeth Garren (or Pfouts), and thus would have been a brother to my own ancestor Philip (c 1784 – 1850).

Samuel was born in Washington County, Indiana circa 1824.  Washington County, Indiana was the original destination for my Copple and Wright families; they arrived in the area circa 1809, purchasing land there before moving from Wayne County, Kentucky (their first stop after leaving the Rowan County, North Carolina area). 

Judging from the 1830 and 1840 census records, and the land patent images available at BLM’s online site, it appears the Copple family moved to Illinois when Samuel was about 15 years old, stopping in the Jefferson/Marion County area. (Both counties are adjacent to each other, Marion having been created from part of Jefferson in 1823.) [1]

Sam married Maria Railey in January 1847; they had 2 daughters: Ellen and Sarah.  Sam died at about the age of 28, and his widow married Abner Faulkner within a fairly short time.

Eli Copple is listed as the Administrator of Sam’s estate; Sam had an older brother Eli, who also lived in Marion County, Illinois.

Samuel Copple Estate Administered

“Administrator’s Notice,” Salem Weekly Advocate (Salem, Illinois), 25 Mar 1852, pg 3, col 7; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

[1] “Marion County, Illinois,” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Marion_County,_Illinois : accessed 24 October 2019).

 

Copples in the News — Thelma Irene gets married

Thelma Irene (Copple) Selsor (1910 – 1995) was born either in Missouri, or in West Frankfort, Illinois, to Gaither Calvin Copple (1878 – 1947) and Eva (Martin) Copple (b. 1888).  She was born 18 April, a few days after the official 1910 census date, but a few days before her neighborhood was enumerated.  A child named “Myrtle” was listed as aged 1/12 (presumably 1 month old) in the household. [1] Could that be Thelma?

As indicated in the article, Thelma Irene married Lawrence Marion Selsor  (1911-1972) in Jonesboro on July 24, 1942.   Thelma worked at the (local?) air base, while Lawrence was with the Works Project Administration.  They took a honeymoon to Memphis, Tennessee. 

A quick search for Thelma Selsor on Ancestry’s page for U.S. city directories (1822 – 1995)  seems to indicate that the Selsors made their home in Jonesboro, Arkansas, after they married.

I did not do enough research on Thelma to determine if she had children.  However, it appears her paternal grandparents were Levi and Malinda (Dobbs) Copple and her great-grandparents were William and Abigail (Handley) Copple.  William’s parents were both Copples, being cousins to each other, and Thelma was likely my 4th cousin 3 times removed.

Thelma Irene Gets Married

“Selsor-Copple Rites are Performed Here,” The Courier News (Blytheville, Arkansas), 31 Jul 1942, page 2, column 1; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 September 2019)

[1] 1910 U.S. census, New Madrid County, Missouri,  population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 108, Hough, page 2B, family 43, Gaither [indexed as Garther] Copple household; digital images, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/ 1910uscenindex/: accessed 18 Oct 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T624, roll 802.

Copples in the News — A Marriage in Spokane, Washington

My extended Copple family apparently reached nearly every Western state, including California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Idaho and Arizona.  This article is about the upcoming wedding of Edward Clifton Copple (c 1879 – 1935) and his bride Olive Isham (1872 – 1956).

A little searching on Ancestry.com points to Edward Copple being the son of Abraham A and Marguerite Mahala (Fimple) Copple.  Edward’s great-grandparents were Jacob [Peter] Copple (c 1757 – 1821) and [Mary?] Elizabeth Garren [or Pfoutz], who are my 6th great-grandparents.

EdwardCliftonCopple_Marriage

“Michigan Girl Spokane Bride,” Spokane Chronicle (Washington) 11 May 1909, pg 6, col 7;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019)

Copples in the News — Bride of a Day goes to Prison

This story, apparently taking place in Logansport, Cass County, Indiana, is so lurid it doesn’t need an introduction.

But I did do some light searching to find out more about whether these people might be related to my own Copple line… more below.

Jessie Mary Copple Killed

Mrs. Mary [sic] Copple was apparently Junie May Harper born circa 1884, and married to a Charles Copple, born in Aug 1884 or 1885 in Missouri.  They had two girls, and had been married about 6 years at the time of her murder.  Charles was, over the years, alternately listed as mulatto or as black in the federal censuses.  Junie May (Harper) Copple was listed as white.

 

“Bride of a Day is Sent to Prison,” Spokane Chronicle (Spokane, Washington) 7 Dec 1912, pg 13, col 3; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 Sep 2019)

1910 U.S. census, Cass County, Indiana, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 26, Logansport Ward 3, page 5A, dwelling 512, Charles Copple household; digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1910uscenindex/ : accessed 22 Sep 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication M624, roll 342.

Lucas County, Ohio, Charles Copple – Olive Moore, 2 July 1923; “Ohio, County Marriage Records, 1774-1993,” Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/fsmarriageohio/ : accessed 21 Sep 2019) > Lucas > 1920-1926 > img 70.

 

 

 

Copples in the News – A 50th Anniversary

Today’s post about Copples in the news is a decidedly happy one.  It is about the upcoming family reunion to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Simpson Jasper Copple (1842-1933) and his wife Alice Flora (Williamson) Copple (1847-1933). 

Simpson’s parents were Andrew Charles Copple (1814-1881) of Indiana and Christina (Fine) Copple of North Carolina.  Andrew Charles was the grandson of Jacob [Peter] Copple and M.E. Garren, my 6th-great grandparents, so Simpson is my late 2nd cousin 5 times removed.

Simpson and Alice were both natives of Illinois, and they were married on 15 June 1868 in Marion County, Illinois.  

Three of their sons are named in the article, but during Simpson and Alice’s long marriage, they raised 9 children.   The family moved from Illinois to Hood River, Oregon around 1885, and it was in Oregon that the youngest two children were born.   

SimpsonCopple_50th_Anniversary

 

“Will Have Family Reunion,” The Semi-Weekly Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington) 4 Jun 1918, pg 7, col 3; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

Copples in the News — Death of a 4 year old girl

I’m stealing a post idea… Randy Seaver’s “Seavers in the News“weekly posts on his blog Genea-Musings, and will start doing a series on Copples in the news.  Copple is one of my ancestral surnames — that of one of my 2nd great-grandmothers, specifically my maternal grandmother’s own maternal grandmother (Libby Copple 1861-1906).

This brief obituary is about a 5 year old (sic) girl named Margaret Bertha Copple, the daughter of Enos Eli and Bertha (Storch) Copple, who lived in Omak, Okanogan County, Washington.

Margaret was born in 1906, and died on 30 August 1910, and therefore was only 4 when she died.  The cause of her death — “infantile paralysis” is, presumably, polio, (but I could be wrong).  Her three year old brother was most likely Harold Enos Copple, who apparently survived and lived to a ripe old age.

Margaret’s father Enos Eli Copple was a native of Centralia, Marion County, Illinois, where a number of my Copple and Wright ancestors settled, moving west from southern Indiana circa 1850.

Margaret was my 4th cousin 3 times removed; our Most Recent Common Ancestors are Jacob [Peter] Copple (c 1757 – 1821) and his wife [Mary] Elizabeth Garren (or Pfoutz?), natives of Rowan County, North Carolina, who moved to Indiana around 1810.

Margaret Bertha Copple died young

“Brief City News,” The Wenatchee Daily World (Washington), 6 Sep 1910, p. 8, col. 3, para. 19; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).