Copples in the News – James Lowry Copple dies

This is a follow-up post to a previous post about James Lowry Copple of Iowa and Illinois (which you can read here.)  He had married Mary Harmsen in 1923, and there was no mention of it being a second marriage.

In this obituary, however, mention is made of his first wife Alice (Applen) Copple, who bore him a son who died in infancy.   The obituary is in sync with the 1910 census which indicates James and Alice were married circa 1906, and that a child was born, but was no longer living.

James died in 1939, and was survived by wife Mary (Harmsen) Copple.

JamesLowryCopple_obit

 

“Funeral Services for James Copple Held in Illinois,” Iowa City Press-Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa), 6 Apr 1939, pg 9, col 4; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 28 October 2019)

Copples in the News – James Copple wed Mary Harmsen

This marriage was between James Lowry Copple, whom I believe to be my 3rd cousin 5 times removed, and his second wife Mary Harmsen in 1923 in Iowa City, Iowa.

Harmsen_Copple 1923 Nuptials

James Lowry Copple was the son of Albert and Isabella (London) Copple.  He was one of 5 known children of theirs.  He was born in 1870 in Indiana and thus was hardly “young” by 1923, although his bride (second wife) was 17 years younger.

James worked as a farmer, and married his first wife around 1906.  They had one son, who died as an infant, before 1910.  After his first wife died in 1920, James remarried in 1923 to Mary Harmsen, whose father, Garrett, was born in Holland.

JamesLowryCopple_FamilyTree

 

“Copple-Harmsen,” Iowa City Press-Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa), 25 Aug 1923, pg 17, col 3;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copples in the News — Estate of Sam Copple (1824 – 1852)

This newspaper clipping appears to be about the estate of the late Samuel Copple (c 1824 – c 1852) of Marion County, Illinois.  Samuel was one of at least 11 children born to David [Allen] Copple & Lavina Huckleberry who resided in Marion County, IL late in their lives.  David was likely the son of Jacob [Peter] Copple and [Mary] Elizabeth Garren (or Pfouts), and thus would have been a brother to my own ancestor Philip (c 1784 – 1850).

Samuel was born in Washington County, Indiana circa 1824.  Washington County, Indiana was the original destination for my Copple and Wright families; they arrived in the area circa 1809, purchasing land there before moving from Wayne County, Kentucky (their first stop after leaving the Rowan County, North Carolina area). 

Judging from the 1830 and 1840 census records, and the land patent images available at BLM’s online site, it appears the Copple family moved to Illinois when Samuel was about 15 years old, stopping in the Jefferson/Marion County area. (Both counties are adjacent to each other, Marion having been created from part of Jefferson in 1823.) [1]

Sam married Maria Railey in January 1847; they had 2 daughters: Ellen and Sarah.  Sam died at about the age of 28, and his widow married Abner Faulkner within a fairly short time.

Eli Copple is listed as the Administrator of Sam’s estate; Sam had an older brother Eli, who also lived in Marion County, Illinois.

Samuel Copple Estate Administered

“Administrator’s Notice,” Salem Weekly Advocate (Salem, Illinois), 25 Mar 1852, pg 3, col 7; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

[1] “Marion County, Illinois,” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Marion_County,_Illinois : accessed 24 October 2019).

 

Copples in the News — Thelma Irene gets married

Thelma Irene (Copple) Selsor (1910 – 1995) was born either in Missouri, or in West Frankfort, Illinois, to Gaither Calvin Copple (1878 – 1947) and Eva (Martin) Copple (b. 1888).  She was born 18 April, a few days after the official 1910 census date, but a few days before her neighborhood was enumerated.  A child named “Myrtle” was listed as aged 1/12 (presumably 1 month old) in the household. [1] Could that be Thelma?

As indicated in the article, Thelma Irene married Lawrence Marion Selsor  (1911-1972) in Jonesboro on July 24, 1942.   Thelma worked at the (local?) air base, while Lawrence was with the Works Project Administration.  They took a honeymoon to Memphis, Tennessee. 

A quick search for Thelma Selsor on Ancestry’s page for U.S. city directories (1822 – 1995)  seems to indicate that the Selsors made their home in Jonesboro, Arkansas, after they married.

I did not do enough research on Thelma to determine if she had children.  However, it appears her paternal grandparents were Levi and Malinda (Dobbs) Copple and her great-grandparents were William and Abigail (Handley) Copple.  William’s parents were both Copples, being cousins to each other, and Thelma was likely my 4th cousin 3 times removed.

Thelma Irene Gets Married

“Selsor-Copple Rites are Performed Here,” The Courier News (Blytheville, Arkansas), 31 Jul 1942, page 2, column 1; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 September 2019)

[1] 1910 U.S. census, New Madrid County, Missouri,  population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 108, Hough, page 2B, family 43, Gaither [indexed as Garther] Copple household; digital images, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/ 1910uscenindex/: accessed 18 Oct 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T624, roll 802.

Copples in the News — Estate of Philip Copple (1784 – 1850), my 5th great-granddad

This particular court notice from early 1853, Washington County, Indiana, is intriguing because I recognize the family group as the likely children and in-laws of my 5th great-granddad Philip Copple.  At the same time, there is more to research — not all the family group is listed here: why?  Certain heirs are mentioned as not being [any longer] residents of Indiana — I can document some but not all.

Philip’s likely daughter Catherine (ca. 1822 – aft 1900) married a William Sluder (c 1828 – c 1878) in Oct 1849 in Washington County, Indiana.  William’s possible father was Henry Sluder (c 1809 – c 1870).  Was the Henry C. Sluder petitioning for a deed or title bond the same man?  And just what is a title bond?

So, clearly, more to research — but here’s what I do know (below article)…

Henry Sluder vs Heirs of Philip Copple

Jacob was Philip’s eldest son, and was my 4th great grandfather.  Margaret (Copple) Sutherland was a sister of Jacob; her husband was Samuel Sutherland.  The Sutherlands lived near the Jacob Copple household near the Newton / Jasper County line in Missouri in 1850.  So, yes, they were not Indiana residents in February 1853 when this notice was published.  John Copple, a brother to Jacob and to Margaret, was also in Newton County, Missouri in 1850.    So far as I know, though, Abraham Copple, likely son of Philip, married Rosanna Hauger in 1847 in Washington County, Indiana, and resided there in 1850, next to Philip Copple [1] (whose third wife, incidentally, was Catherine Hauger).  

Abraham Copple 1850 Washington Co IND

However, since I only recently came across this article, it is possible that I have my Abraham Copples misidentified.  Surely the persons identified in the notice would have known which of their siblings was no longer living in Indiana!  (More research needed here.)  Or, Abraham could have resided a short time outside Indiana in the 1853 time frame, only to return by 1860. 

The other persons mentioned are Joshua Barr [Bare], Betsy Ann Barr [Bare], and Nancy Barr [Bare].  Joshua and Nancy’s names were already familiar to me as the children of the late Nancy (Copple) Bare, another daughter of Philip.  Nancy married in December 1830, so in February 1853, those three children could have been of age.

To summarize, the questions I have which need answering are:

  • Do I have Abraham Copple correctly identified?
  • What is a title bond?  And why was Henry Sluder fighting for one?  And, if he was indeed the father-in-law of Catherine (Copple) Sluder, why was he involved, and not his son?
  • Why weren’t the rest of the heirs involved in this?  Philip had other children living in February 1853, and Nancy (Copple) Bare was survived by additional minor children.

 

“Henry Sluder v Heirs of Phillip Copple,” The Washington Democrat (Salem, Indiana), 11 Feb 1853, pg 3, col 1; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019)

[1] 1850 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, population schedule, Posey Township, page 239 (stamped), dwelling 509, family 522, Abram [“Abren”] Copple household; digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1850usfedcenancestry/ : accessed 17 October 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication M432, roll 179.

 

Copples in the News — Looking for Grandpa Copple before the Internet

The grandfather in this story I believe to be my own 3rd great granddad, Benjamin Franklin Copple, an Indiana native, who did in fact live in Arizona (near Sedona) in the later years of his life.

Mrs Antolla wants info

Mrs. Antolla (1882 – 1951) was Annie Bernice (Clark) Antolla, wife of Fred, and daughter of James Henry Hall Clark (1852-1912) and Annie B Copple (c 1859 – 1882).  Annie was one of four (or possibly five) daughters of Ben Franklin Copple and Phoebe Harvey; her younger sister Elizabeth (aka Libby) was my great-great grandma.

When Phoebe (Harvey) Copple died ca 1862, leaving behind children no older than 10 years old, Ben farmed them out to folks in the area (Sonoma County, California).   

Annie lived in the Ransom Petray household in Russian River Township in 1870, two households away from James Clark, whom she later married.  She gave birth to Annie Bernice in Feb 1882, and died the next day.

Ben, the missing grandfather, was found in Mendocino County in 1870, as a “single” man doing mining work.  By 1876, though, he was down in Yavapai County, Arizona, where he lived out the rest of his life, marrying a Native American of the Modoc tribe and having 3 sons.

Interestingly, this post is dated February 1908.  In the 10 September 1908 issue of Healdsburg Tribune, Enterprise and Scimitar, on page 2, column 2, there is a short article about B.F. Copple and son Bert of Arizona visiting Healdsburg, where daughter Mrs. Mary [Copple] Long resided.   Mary was the only daughter still alive then, but did she have any contact with her niece Annie (Clark) Antolla?  And, if so, was Annie there to also meet her grandfather?

 

 

“Information Wanted,” Arizona Republic (Phoenix, Arizona) 16 Feb 1908, pg 6, col 2;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019)

Copples in the News — Grant Copple marries Laura Shay

Grant Milton Copple was likely my 4th cousin 3 times removed.  He was the son of William Linton Copple and Lenora (Stough) Copple, both Iowa natives.

Laura Olive Shay was the daughter of Harry Shay, a native of England, and Olive Hill, a native of Rock County, Illinois.

Sadly, their marriage lasted only 7-1/2 years, ending with Laura’s death at the age of approximately 27 years.  She was survived by her husband Grant, and by their three young children.

Shay-Copple

“Shay – Copple,” The Daily Times (Davenport, Iowa), 20 Jul 1920, pg 17, col 5;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

Copples in the News — Sam Copple’s views on Civil War politics

My second cousin 5 times removed, Sam Copple, a native of Jefferson County, Illinois, was born in July 1837 to William and Abigail (Handley) Copple.  Sam’s paternal grandparents, John and Catherine Copple, were first cousins to each other.

Sam served in the Civil War for 3 years as a part of the 11th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. It was during this time he wrote the editorial below.

I had never heard the term “Copperhead” as it relates to the Civil War. According to the online Encyclopedia Britannica, was a pejorative term for Northerners who wanted to negotiate a settlement with the South rather than fight a war to preserve the Union.[1]

Sam C Copple War Views

“Letter from the 11th Ill. Reg.,” Centralia Sentinel (Centralia, Illinois), 20 Aug 1863, pg 2, col 4; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 12 December 2013)

[1] “Copperhead – American Political Faction”, Encyclopedia Brittanica (https://www.britannica.com/topic/Copperhead-American-political-faction : accessed 24 Sep 2019).

Cite/link to this post: Cathy M. Dempsey, “Copples in the News — Sam Copple’s views on Civil War politics,” Genes and Roots, posted 21 Oct 2019 (https://genesandroots.com : accessed (date)).

How I use the Shared Clustering Tool

The other day, in the Facebook user group for the Shared Clustering Tool created by Jonathan Brecher, I saw a post about how different folks use the tool.  I mentioned capturing MRCA information and aligning it to the clusters, but thought I would expound here in a blog post.

Before I begin, I’m making one basic assumption for this post — that you’ve already started playing with the Shared Clustering tool yourself. 

First of all, I only use it for Ancestry matches at this time, primarily because that’s where I have the most matches (ditto for my mom and my dad) and because Ancestry currently doesn’t provide segment information.

Secondly, although the tool offers the option of downloading match data directly from Ancestry, I do not use that feature.  Instead, I use the match and ICW (“In Common With”) files downloaded from Ancestry via DNAGedcom.com, which is, frankly, my go-to tool. 

DNAGedCom’s CSV files are my go-to files because I’m most comfortable using Excel – one of the reasons I like Shared Clustering, actually – and because that’s how I started, and I’ve kept on.   (Long story short, had I begun by using Ancestry’s Notes feature more effectively than I did, I could save myself some time, but I do it all in my DNAGedCom match file, and then update each subsequent download using VLOOKUP.)

An example of tracking on my mom’s Ancestry DNA match list (via DNAGedCom) is shown below:

Mom_DNAGedCom_MRCA

Color-coded by known MRCA.  If I’m not certain of the MRCA, based on the clustering, I add comments like “Copple kin” or “Hill?”

I upload the MRCA information to the completed Shared Clustering file via VLOOKUP since Jonathan has so nicely included the Test ID in the tool.  Usually, I will take the time to color-code the MRCA data in the Shared Clustering result file, simply so I can zoom out and easily see which cluster “belongs” to which possible MRCA.

Below you can see where I’ve zoomed out to see a fairly large clustering of my matches.  I’ve zoomed out to 10% and have highlighted 284 matches.  Per Jonathan Brecher’s Wiki, the red color indicates likely shared DNA.  The gray color indicates that, although the two matches (one in the row and one in the column) do not share DNA with each other, they likely share with a third person.  You can also see (barely) my color-coded MRCA notes on the left side of the image.

Cathy_SharedMatches_1

So, let’s zoom in a bit on this large cluster.

Below, notice that I have highlighted in green (as indicated by the yellow arrows) one of my closest matches (although she is a 4th cousin 1 removed).  She and I share a common ancestral couple:  Jacob Copple and Margaret Blalock, my 4th great-grandparents.  We also share 3 segments of DNA, and two of those segments are indicated here, in the cluster of red at the top left, and the cluster of red (circled in yellow).  Note the vertical line of red that merges into a vertical line of green — the red is showing me that she and I share DNA with the bulk of the two circled groups.

Cathy_SharedMatches_4

What does this tell us?  First it indicates two different segments of DNA, so if we go far enough back in time, it would be 2 different ancestors.   Second, she and I likely share those 2 segments of DNA.  Third, all the associated gray indicates a link between these 2 segments of DNA, so these matches are all most likely related to me via one ancestor and upstream of that ancestor.

Let’s zoom in even further and look more closely, now at my MRCA/clustering information I’ve imported from DNAGedCom.  The blue labels refer to matches who are Blalock/Blaylock descendants.  The gray labels reference a known match on Chromosome 9.

Cathy_SharedMatches_2

This would seem to point at the connection being on a segment of chromosome 9 and also relating to Margaret (Blalock) Copple.  This does not mean these matches share Margaret (Blalock) Copple as an ancestor with me, but rather one of Margaret’s own ancestors.

To put it another way, I have a clue!  These shared cluster results would seem to indicate that I need to do more research on Margaret (Blalock) Copple’s line, and connect with the matches who are Blalock descendants. And, at other DNA vendors, I should connect with matches who share the same segment on chromosome 9 to find out how or if they might be connected to a Blalock/Blaylock ancestor.

SharedClustering_Chr9

Let’s look at the second cluster, below.  This zoomed-in, partial view show matches who potentially share a segment on chromosome 13 with me.  Based on their Ancestry tree information, there are some who share Jacob Copple and Margaret Blalock as common ancestors with me (just one shown here).

SharedClustering_Chr13

Other matches in this cluster have no Copple or Blalock at all in their tree.  Their trees could be incomplete or incorrect, of course (as could mine!)  OR, their trees could be indicating a shared ancestor further “upstream” (meaning, a possible ancestor of Margaret (Blalock) Copple.  To that end, I’ve noted where there are Hemphill and Hungate ancestors in my matches’ trees.

These Hemphill and Hungate families, according to the Ancestry trees of my matches, hailed from Kentucky (where Margaret Blalock was born ca. 1810) and a branch of the Hungate family ended up in Washington County, Indiana in the 1810’s – 1830’s.  This is the same county Margaret lived in during the same time frame.  Although not definitive, it’s worth noting as a potential clue.

In summary, because the two groups are related (as indicated by all the gray associated with them), both DNA segments the groupings indicate are more likely to have been inherited by me from Margaret (Blalock) Copple (and, ultimately, her ancestors) rather than from her husband Jacob Copple.

Here’s another example of a cluster on my Copple line, where you can quickly see, from the teal color on the left-hand side, that these matches share an MRCA.  In fact, I use the teal to indicate more than one generation of Copple ancestors (all also ancestors of Jacob Copple who married Margaret Blalock).

SharedClustering_COPPLE

The last example is a line from my dad’s side.  As with the Copple and Blalock lines from my mother’s side, this paternal line is rooted in the United States from at least 1800 if not decades before that. 

The bulk of these DNA matches share my third great-grandparents, Anderson Lamburth and Ermine Farley (or Farnham).  However, they are clearly grouped in two clusters, so that one set may share Lamburth DNA and another set Farley DNA, or “upstream” (as in Anderson’s mother and Anderson’s father, or Ermine’s two parents).

Most intriguing is the linking between the two clusters.  Not just the general gray, but the vertical red lines indicated by the blue arrow.  I need to look more closely at these two matches — their names will be in the column headers (not shown here for privacy reasons). 

One, they likely share 2 DNA segments with me.  Two, they clearly share DNA with the small cluster on the upper left, as well as the larger cluster on the lower right.  AND the folks in the middle who are only indirectly related (indicated by gray) to the two obvious clusters.

SharedClustering_LAMBURTH

One other item to note in this cluster.  Some of the MRCAs are not highlighted in yellow.  That’s legit; referenced is the granddaughter of Anderson & Ermine, Mary (Lamburth) Dempsey, who was my great-grandma and her husband William. Clearly, the segment shared here relates to Mary rather than William.

If you use the Shared Clustering tool to visualize your Ancestry DNA matches, do you use any visualization aids to assign clusters to ancestors?  Perhaps you make better use of the Notes field than I do?

 

Cite/link to this post: Cathy M. Dempsey, “How I use the Shared Clustering Tool,Genes and Roots, posted 21 Oct 2019 (https://genesandroots.com : accessed (date)).

 

 

Copples in the News – Maggie gets married

Margaret “Maggie” Copple (1861 – 1929) was the daughter of Samuel Copple and Mary Ann Rhoades.  Mary Ann herself had Copple blood, being the daughter of David D Rhoades and Celia Copple.  She is related to me on 3 lines: her maternal grandmother’s line (Copple), her father’s paternal grandfather’s line (Copple, obviously) and her father’s paternal grandmother’s line (Wright).

She and her family moved to Mendocino County, California during the 1870s, and married Samuel Duncan in Nov 1881 in Cloverdale, Sonoma County, California.  They would have 5 children, per the 1900 Federal Census, but only two would outlive Maggie.

Copple-Duncan

“Local Items,” Cloverdale Reveille (Cloverdale, California), 26 Nov 1881, pg 5, col 2;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 21 Sept 2019)

1900 U.S. census, Mendocino County, California, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 75, Sanel, page 3, dwelling 51, Samuel Duncan household; digital images, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1900usfedcen/: accessed 23 Sep 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T623, roll 93.