Copples in the News – B.F. Copple and the copper mine

This particular article, about B.F. Copple and the copper mine district near his home in Mesa, Arizona, is about either my third great-granddad, Benjamin Franklin Copple (c 1829 – 1911) or his son Benjamin Franklin Copple (1877 – 1948).  The latter was my great-great grandmother Libby’s half brother.   I suspect it was the younger of the two men, as this article was published in 1903, when the senior Ben Copple would have been 74 years old.

From what I can determine, copper mining was big in Bisbee, Arizona (southeast of Tucson, near the border with Mexico) at the turn of the 20th century, and is still an important industry in the state today.  Thus, this article was published in the Bisbee paper.  However, the Dixie Mining District appears to relate to mines in the Maricopa County area, roughly 15 miles from Mesa.  (See these links: http://docs.azgs.az.gov/OnlineAccessMineFiles/C-F/DixieMaricopaT4NR5ESec25.pdf and https://thediggings.com/mines/2880 )

Bisbee_Daily_Review_Tue__Nov_17__1903_

 

“Two Chances,” Bisbee Daily Review (Bisbee, Arizona), 17 Nov 1903, pg 6, col 2;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 3 December 2019)

 

 

Book Review: New Church Records Book!

This book sounds like something I need to look into! U.S. church records are not something I’ve generally looked at…

Genealogy Pants

ChurchRecordsBookI have recently had the privilege to read and review the new book How to Find Your Family History in U.S. Church Records: A Genealogist’s Guide by Sunny Jane Morton and Harold A. Henderson, CG (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2019). Back in 2015 I attended the course “Problem Solving with Church Records” at the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP) with Rev. David McDonald, CG as the instructor. It was a fantastic course (highly recommend!) and I have used the information from that course time and again but have longed to have a text with the information learned laid out in a concise manual. This book is the answer!

The book has two parts, the first is methodological and the second addresses twelve different denominations: Anglican/Episcopal, Baptist, Congregational, Dutch Reformed/Reformed Church in America, German Churches: Reformed and Sectarian, Latter-Day Saint (Mormon), Lutheran, Mennonite and Amish, Methodist, Quaker (Religious Society of…

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Woo-hoo!! Just finished!

I just completed the Boston University online class for the Certificate of Genealogical Research!  Turned in my research report on Sunday the 16th, and the grades for both the report and for the final module (“Professional Genealogy”) were posted yesterday.  I have done well enough in the modules (all graded) to get a certificate.   I will be looking for it to arrive in the mail within the next few weeks.

When it arrives, I will post a photo — AND my review of this course.  The books used were changed for the Fall 2018 session and the course was modified (somewhat) dropping the number of modules to 4 (from 5).

The registration deadline for the next class, starting in January 2019, is tomorrow!  More info can be found here.

(For a certificate, your grade for each module must be a “C” or better AND the total grade average for all 4 modules must be “B-” or better.)