Throwback Thursdays #tbt – Christian Fredson and family

Christian Alfred Fredson (aka Chris) was one of my relatives on my Danish side, related to me through my maternal grandmother’s father.  In fact, my great-grandpa Charlie Holst was a first cousin of Chris.

In this photo, on the front porch of their home in Geyserville, Sonoma County, California — I do not know if the house is still standing — Chris is the young man on the left.  He was born in 1891, a few years after my great-grandfather, and is probably in his late 20’s in this photo.

His mother, Sophie (Thomsen) Fredson is to Chris’ left.  Sophie was my great-grandfather Charlie’s maternal aunt, a younger sister of Caroline (Thomsen) Holst.  Sophie was born in 1860 in the Danish duchy of Slesvig, just a few years before Bismarck invaded, and that land became part of what is now Germany.  (Sophie died in 1924; therefore this photo was taken no later than that year.)

Fredson2400dpi

Seated on the steps is Chris’ wife Geneva (Eagle)Fredson (1891-1973).  Next to Geneva is their first-born son, Leonard, who was born in 1914, and looks to be about 2 years old (so the photo was likely taken around 1916.)

Behind Geneva and Leonard are 3 older adults.  I am presuming that the man with white whiskers and the woman are Geneva’s parents, but cannot confirm that.  The man wearing suspenders and seated in what might be a rocking chair is Israel Fredson.  He was Chris’s dad, born in Sweden (somewhere!) in 1850.

Chris Fredson had an older sister, Hilda, who never married, and an older brother Charles, who had one daughter.  Chris and Geneva had 3 children: the aforementioned Leonard, a daughter Anna (1918-1925), and a son Donald (1919-2007).

Throwback Thursdays #tbt – Maria Donini First Communion

I love this First Communion photo!  It’s labeled as “Maria Donini”.  To be honest, I don’t know exactly who she is!   But the photo could be dated anywhere from, say, the 1920s to the 1940s (?)

However, I do have some clues.  My great-grandmother, Maria (Bolognesi) Diamantini, had a younger sister Annuziata (born c. 1879 – died c. 1949), who married a man by the last name of Donini.  (Sadly, I don’t know the name of Mr. Donini.) 

I also know the Bolognesi family came from Sant’Elpidio A Mare, in the province of Fermo, in the region of Marche.  Perhaps the Donini family did too?

donini_maria

If you might know who the Donini family is, or who Maria Donini is, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

 

Throwback Thursdays #tbt – Lorenza Bolognesi Mataloni

This photo is of my great-grandaunt Lorenza (Bolognesi) Mataloni, the younger sister of my great-grandmother Maria (Bolognesi) Diamantini.  

Lorenza was born 1877 in Italy, and she died in 1964 in Civitanova Marche, Italy.  She married Giuseppe Mataloni, and had two children that I know of: Antonio and Maria.

bolognesi_lorenza

The two sisters, Maria and Lorenza, definitely look like family.  My great-grandma is on the left.

 

Ancestry ThruLines: Analysis of my mom’s lines

Yesterday I read Roberta Estes’ blog post on ThruLines, which you can read here.  It’s amazing how quickly she can research and walk you through new DNA tools that come to light!  I adopted my own version of her spreadsheet, a snippet of which you can find on that same blog post.  

Rather than focus on my own ThruLines, I focused on my mother’s ThruLines.  Here is the tree her DNA is linked to.  Note that I have not done any work on Mom’s paternal side (Italian lines) — but I do have the tree out to her 4 Italian great-grandparents.  I feel confident about Maria Bolognesi’s parents, and about Giuseppe Diamantini’s father.  The name Maddelena Serafini comes from another branch of the family, without attendant documentation, so it may or may not be correct.

Mom_Tree

Below is a screenshot of Mom’s closest ancestors who have ThruLines.  Note that Maria Bolognesi, her paternal grandmother, is missing. I have no idea why.  Mom’s closest match at Ancestry — after my sibling and I — is her paternal 1st cousin, who would likely share DNA with mom from both the Diamantini line AND the Bolognesi line.

ThruLineAncestors

Speculation on my part as to why Maria Bolognesi is missing is that there are 2 other DNA matches to Mom and her paternal 1st cousin (alias “Elena”) who match them on the Diamantini side.  Except for Mom’s siblings (who have not tested) and “Elena’s” sibs (who also haven’t tested), no other Bolognesi kin is known to be in the U.S.  Perhaps this is why Ancestry ThruLines are focusing on the Diamantini side??

Another possibility — again, this is speculation on my part — is that my mom and “Elena” share a relatively low amount of DNA (619 cM) for full-blooded first cousins.  The paperwork (birth certificates, marriage licenses, family tradition, family resemblances, etc.) indicates full first cousins, but Ancestry is treating them as half 1st cousins, presumably because of the amount of DNA shared (?).  Could that be why Ancestry has deemed them half 1st cousins, and thus ignored their shared grandmother?  (Both have the grandmother in their trees, so it’s not a lack of matching, as far as I can tell.)

ThruLines links Mom’s Serafini line specifically to one Ancestry member tree.  This particular member either has not done a DNA test, or simply does not match Mom at all.  However, this person has over 400 Serafini persons in their tree; it appears the tree includes all the Serafini families from one specific community in the Abruzzo region of Italy.  (Abruzzo borders the Adriatic Sea, and is just south of the Marche region, which is where my known Italian ancestors are from, and where known kin is living now.)

This Ancestry member’s tree with 400+ Serafini persons in it was a source tree for the tree created by the wife of a known second cousin to Mom on Mom’s Diamantini line.  No other sources (such as baptismal records, marriage records, censuses, etc.) are shown in either tree.  All 3 trees, though  — meaning Mom’s, the 400+ Serafini tree, and the 2nd cousin’s wife’s tree — have a “Maddelena Serafini”.  (She is married to someone different in each tree.)

The Abruzzo region connection with Serafini is intriguing; however, there is nothing else to go on, given no sources to review and validate for all of these names.  

Ancestry ThruLines, though, provides Mom with 42 potential new ancestors, 20 of whom are supposedly on her Serafini line (as shown below in the screenshot of Excel).  I say “no DNA matches on Ancestry to this line” referring to the fact that the trees Ancestry used to determine these 20 potential ancestors are trees of members who share no DNA with my mother.

Mom_PotentialAncestors

Below is the screenshot for how I  broke out Mom’s 254 possible ancestors through the 7th generation (through 5th great-grandparents).  Yes, her tree has a lot of blanks in it; 201 ancestors are not in her tree at all.  The bulk of those, though, are on her father’s Italian side.  By contrast, her most complete line is her 2nd great-grandfather Copple’s line, with only 5 persons missing from the tree.

Mom_ThruLines

So, the numbers that truly matter relate to the 53 ancestors who are in her tree.  Note that 20 ancestors have no known DNA matches in Ancestry; they are recently immigrated (late 1870’s) from Denmark — now Germany — and had small families with no living descendants today except for Mom, her kids and her grandkids.

The 3 missing ancestors are her paternal grandmother and parents of that grandmother.  Claus Clausen, Mom’s 4th great-grandfather and in her tree, was replaced by a Claus Clausen from a tree whose owner is not a DNA match.  Mary Addams in Mom’s tree was also replaced with another Ancestry member’s Mary Addams.  Mary was the likely stepmother of Mom’s direct ancestor, James Englehart, having married Samuel Englehart in Guernsey County, Ohio, some 5 years after James was born in Pennsylvania.

Regardless of her genetic relationship to us, Mary Addams was already in Mom’s tree, so it’s not clear why she was ignored in favor of someone else’s tree.

Moms53Ancestors

The 28 ancestors in Mom’s tree with DNA-match descendants are primarily the ancestors who have been in the United States the longest, since at least 1730 in some cases, to the best of my knowledge.  All of them are ancestors of my mother’s maternal grandmother, Hazel (Englehart) Holst. Hazel’s paternal grandmother, Hannah (Hill) Englehart, and Hazel’s maternal grandfather, Ben Franklin Copple, have the most-complete branches on Mom’s tree.  They are indicated by the blue check marks.

Many of these DNA matches also currently show up in my mom’s DNA circles for some of these same ancestors.  A number of the relationships I feel fairly confident about, having done my own documentation of the relationships involved. 

However, some of the trees used in these ThruLines I believe are incorrect — especially regarding Philip Copple, Mom’s 4th great granddad, who is, in many Ancestry trees, mixed up with his cousin Philip.  Both had daughters named Catherine, and named Margaret.  Assignment of the daughters to the fathers is, frankly, a mess!  (And it was a mess showing up in Shaky Leaf hints as well as the Philip Copple circle.)

HillLineCoppleLine

The bottom line is that I see a flood of Serafini potential ancestors, which would be awesome if I actually do some Italian research and trace my (reported) Serafini line.  Maybe that 400+ Serafini tree does have accurate — if undocumented — information.

I also know I cannot trust ThruLines any more than I trusted DNA circles or shaky leaf Shared Ancestor Hints.

And I suspect I will find similar issues when I explore my dad’s ThruLines shortly.

All that said, I saved the best for last…. thank to ThruLines, I just found out that possibly one more of Jacob Copple’s 7 children (who lived to adulthood and had descendants) may actually have a descendant alive today who also DNA-tested and matches Mom!!  I will be working to validate this match’s tree if I cannot connect with the person.  (See below.) I had thought Milton’s descendants were all deceased by the 1940’s.  If this proves out, 6 of the 7 children who had descendants (and 6 of 9 who lived to adulthood) not only tested but match Mom.   

This matters to me because Libby Copple was my original brick wall; oral history indicated she was a “Copple”.  It has only been with DNA testing that her likely father, Ben, and his family have been revealed.

JacobCopple

Cite/link to this post: Cathy M. Dempsey, “Ancestry ThruLines: Analysis of my mom’s lines” Genes and Roots, posted 12 Mar 2019 (https://genesandroots.com : accessed (date)).

 

Throwback Thursdays #tbt – Marietta Diamantini Ferroni

I’m going to continue to post photographs once a week on “Throwback Thursdays”, starting with some of my Italian relatives, about whom I know very little.

One thing I do know is that my Diamantini kin came from in and around the town of Fano, on the coast of the Adriatic Sea, in the province of Pesaro e Urbino, in the Marche region.

FanoItaly_GoogleMaps

Google Maps. “Fano, Province of Pesaro and Urbino, Italy”, Google (https://www.google.com/maps/place/61032+Fano,+Province+of+Pesaro+and+Urbino,+Italy/@43.4913364,14.8439515,7.01z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x132d105e7324a691:0x477a64d9766b3c0a!8m2!3d43.8398164!4d13.0194201?hl=en : accessed 7 Feb 2019).

This photo is of a woman believed to be my great-grandfather Guiseppe Diamantini’s sister, Marietta, who married Enrico Ferroni.  She was born 12 February 1887 and died 16 December 1980.  I believe Marietta and Enrico had 3 sons: Attilo, Hugo, and Gino.  That’s all I know.

imag3607

 

William Wright Estate Settlement — Monroe County, Indiana

Some of my Wright collateral kin lived in Monroe County, Indiana in the early 19th century, but I haven’t yet figured out how all of them tie to my own direct line.  A case in point is the William Wright whose estate was settled in the early 1850s, administered by Pleasant Fossett.

I worked a bit on this problem late this past summer (Aug/Sep 2018) but had to put it aside as I was taking the online BU Certificate for Genealogical Research course.  There is a Philbert/Filbart Wright living in Monroe County in 1820, who would have been born ca 1751.  It is possible — but pure speculation at this point! — he is the father of William and William’s siblings named in William’s estate.  It is also possible — but again, there is nothing definitive — that the Filbart/Philbert born ca. 1751 was a son of Peter  Wright (1717 – bef. 1767) and uncle of Richard Wright (c 1726 – c 1784).

Philbert is not a name used everyday, even in this era (1720 – 1820) and it was used a lot in this particular Wright family.  Hence, the idea that these folks are related collaterally to my line (descending through Richard Wright 1726-1784).

Here is the document of the final settlement, retrieved from FamilySearch

wright william_monroe_in_fhl1295695_probateorderbookf p 473-74

Here is my transcription, and all my own comments and notes to it are in red.  Names of the deceased’s kin are in blue:

February Term M Probate Court 1852     6th day                                                    p 473-474

William Wrights Est.

Pleasant Fossett, Admn.

Of William Wrights Est.

Vs.                                                                      Petition to sell real estate to pay debts

William Wrights heirs

To the hour F. L. Butter Judge of the Probate Court of Monroe County in the State of Indiana

The Memorial of Pleasant Fossett Administrator of the Estate of William Wright deceased who died intestate, Respectfully showeth that the personal estate of the said intestate which has come into his hands accounts to the sum of $2.10 that the whole thereof is now remaining in the hands of your petitioner, and that the same is insufficient for the payment of the expenses of Administration and taxes, that have been accrued on the real estate of said intestate as appears by the account herewith produced & that the said intestate at the time of his death was the owner of Certain real estate, situate in the County of Monroe in the State of Indiana and known as the North East quarter of the South East quarter of Section Twenty Nine, in Township Seven North of Range Two West, containing forty acres be the same more or less, which land of the said intestate held by certificate from the land office held at Vincennes & in the state of Indiana.  The probable amount of said real estate is ($125) dollars.

[This land of William’s is in the same section as land purchased in 1827 by Peter Wright (b 1795) who is in the 1860 census living with Pleasant Fossett’s family.  Sec 29 of T7N R2W is also where Pleasant and his father John Smith Fossett bought land.  Not only is Mary Ann (Crum) Fossett Peter’s niece, but their property is adjacent.]

There was no debts due or owing by the decedent at the time of his death as far as your petitioner can ascertain but the costs of Administration and Taxes on said real estate as far as your petitioner can ascertain at this time are as follows to wit.

1st clerks fees including all of them up to this time         $3.00

2nd printers fees for advertising, taking out letters for administration & sale of

Personal property                                                                  $2.00

3rd Administrator’s fees including taxes on said real estate &

Other expenses necessarily incurred                                  $8.00

Making together                                                                       13.00

Amount of personal estate as per sale bill now on file is                                                                                                                                                                     2.10

Leaving a deficit to be paid out of the real estate of                                                                                                                                                                           10.90

That the said William Wright deceased left as his heirs and legal representatives,

Rachel Right and Peter Wright his sister or brother adult persons and both of the County of Monroe and State of Indiana [this Peter Wright is born ca 1795 in NC and is at Indian Creek, Monroe in 1850/1860/1870.  Rachel, born ca 1777 in NC, is in Peter’s household in 1850.  He bought land in Sec 29, above.]

And also Elijah Wright, Jacob Crum, John H Crum, Mary Ann Fossett and David Crum adult persons, and all of whom are brothers and sisters children of the said deceased, all of the before named heirs are of Monroe County and State of Indiana. [probably children of Sally Wright and John Crum.  Mary Ann Fossett is married to Pleasant Fossett, the Administrator.  Elijah may be a brother of William, b 1800 NC, living in Monroe Co.]  

Also Anna Rawley a sister of the said deceased an adult person who has a legal guardian to wit John Rawley

[Anna Wright married Evans Rawley.  She was living with son John Rawley in Lafayette Twp, Owen County, IN in 1850.]

& probably Andrew Fry, and Rawley Wright William Crum Mary Greenwood, Nancy Fry, Elizabeth Christ or Christy [Criss], and Sarah Clark Adult persons all of whom are brothers and sisters children, and all of them probably living in the County of Owen and State of Indiana.

[These are mostly siblings – William Crum may be a cousin – of a brother of William, name unknown.]

Also Philbert Wright and Peter Wright adult persons who are brothers children of the deceased and are living in the county of Green and State of Indiana

[These 2 men are in Greene County in 1850.  Philbert born ca 1802, Peter born ca 1811.  The document reads as though they are the children of one of the decedent’s brothers.  Peter married Elizabeth Fossett in 1832 in Monroe County (?)]

 Eliza Cooper [nee Crum, apparently daughter of John and Sally (Wright) Crum] an adult persons whom are a sisters child of the deceased and are probaby living in the County of Wayne.

And Sarah Sinks Christena Sares, Mary Inyard, Nicy Fine, Lavina Flood, Rachel Starr, and Matilda her husband’s name not known, all adult persons who are sisters children of the deceased whom are probably living in the State of Illinois the county not known.

[all siblings, likely children of unknown Sears and wife Mary Wright]

The foregoing named persons as your petitioner believes are all the heirs and legal representatives of said decedent.  Your memorialist therefore prays your honor to grant him an order of the aforesaid real estate, or so much thereof as will be sufficient to discharge the said taxes that have accrued on said real estate and the expense of Administration, and other legal demands that may be made against said real estate, and such expenses as may hereafter accrue, Also your memorialist prays your honor to appoint suitable men to appraise the foregoing real estate.

June the 2nd day 1851.                                                 Pleasant Fossett, Admnr.

Order of Appraisement

State of Indiana                February Term 1852

Monroe County, SS

On the application of Pleasant Fossett administrator of the estate of William Wright deceased late of the county aforesaid.  It is ordered that Joseph Pennington & William Ragain be appointed appraisers to appraise the N.E. qr of the S.E. qr of Section 29 T7 R2 West with its improvements lying in the County aforesaid, it being the real estate of said decedent, and make report of such appraisement to this court at this term.

And said appraisers being duly sworn returned into Court the following appraisement to wit.

We the undersigned appointed by the within order to appraise the premises therein described having been sworn according to law, do report that on our Consideration of the premises we are of opinion that the said land with its improvements is worth One hundred and twenty five dollars, and do appraise the same accordingly.

Joseph Pennington                                                                                                                                 William Ragain

Allowed one dollar each $200 for both

 

Transcribed by Cathy Dempsey on 9/22/18; all comments in red are mine. – cd

Monroe County, Indiana, Circuit Court, Probate Order Book Volume F:473-474, William Wright estate settlement; digital images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007663444?cat=213753 : accessed 17 September 2018), image 646.