Copples in the News – Claiborne Copple “smells a rat”

As best as I can determine, Claiborne Copple of Jackson County, Indiana — who, in this article is apparently suspicious of his wife’s fidelity — is a possible distant cousin of mine via his father David (1794 – 1835) and grandfather John (1768 – 1838).

Claiborne was born circa 1827 probably in Kentucky (but possibly in southern Indiana), likely one of at least 10 children.   He married Mary Holt, his first wife, in Clark County, Indiana in 1856, and resided in Clark County at the time of the 1860 census.  By 1863, though, when he signed up for the Civil War draft, he was in Jackson County, Indiana.  His wife died circa 1876, and he remarried to an Elizabeth King in 1877.  

He was found in the 1880 census in Jackson County, Indiana.  (As an aside, I have not found any information on when he died, nor have I found him on the 1850 and 1870 censuses.)  It is apparently wife #2 (Eliza) who was “in the company of James Cole”.

Claiborne Copple

“He Smelt a Mouse,” Jackson County Banner (Brownstown, Indiana), 2 Nov 1882, pg 5, col 4; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 7 February 2020).

cathymd, “Copple/Wright Line – DNA Kinship — Working Data Tree”, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/62591313/person/36185456378/facts : accessed 7 February 2020).

 

 

 

 

 

Copples in the News — Benjamin G Copple accused of attempted murder

In October 1924, a teen-aged Benjamin Garl Copple (c 1906-1986) was accused of attempted murder of a young woman and man, while he was under the influence of liquor. Ben was married at the time, to a Bernice Amott his “child bride”, who was only 15 at the time of the article in February 1925.  Ben had reportedly been working for the sheriff until the day before, under an assumed name (not given in the article) and an assumed age (22).  His father, A. M. Copple [Alpheus Marvin] testified on his behalf.

Ben Garl Copple was born sometime between 1903 and 1907 probably in Colorado to Alpheus Marvin Copple (1881 – 1944) and Lucinda Mary Whitlock (1884 – 1978), both natives of North Carolina.  The family was living in Las Animas County, Colorado in 1910, and in Salt Lake City in 1920.  

After the shooting incident in October 1924, Ben married Bernice Amott (who was with him on the day of the shooting, per the article below) on 26 January 1925.  The article states Bernice was filing for an annulment of the marriage and that must have gone through, as Ben married Edith Olga Shafer on 27 June 1925.

The 1930 census found Ben and Edith, with their daughter Joyce, in Salt Lake City, and Ben worked as a laborer.  In 1940, they were in the Los Angeles area, where Ben worked as a truck driver.

Benjamin Garl’s paternal grandfather shared the same name as my 3rd great grandfather: Benjamin Franklin Copple, but that Ben Copple lived his entire life in North Carolina.  Ben Franklin Copple’s parents were Henry and Frances “Franky” (Miller) Copple.  Henry’s parents are unknown; however Frances Miller’s father Isaac Miller lived in the vicinity with 3 Copple households in Davidson County, NC, which I’ve traced as my kin.  It is possible — but not certain — that Henry’s parents were Jacob Copple and Delilah Plummer.

If so, these Salt Lake City Copples are distant cousins to me.

Benjamin Garl Copple attempted murder

“Got Liquor as Undercover Man,” Salt Lake Telegram (Salt Lake City, Utah), 18 Feb 1925, pg 2, col 8; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 13 January 2020).

 

 

 

 

 

Copples in the News – Glenn Copple appointed deputy DA

Glenn Copple (1888 – 1965) was appointed Deputy to Yuma County (Arizona) District Attorney Henry C. Kelly.

Glenn was born in Nov 1888 in Centralia, Illinois to Silas Bryan & Julia (Roper) Copple, who married in 1884.  He was their second son.  Silas Bryan Copple’s paternal great-grandparents were Jacob [Peter] Copple and [Mary] Elizabeth Garren [Pfoutz?], who are my 6th great-grandparents.

Glenn was in the military from Aug 1917 to July 1919, and after arriving home back in Centralia, was a lawyer.  He moved to Yuma, Arizona prior to January 1925, which is when he became the assistant District Attorney.

He married Janet Anne Burnell in 1934 in Phoenix, Maricopa County, and they had a son Gordon Burnell in April 1936 in Los Angeles County, California.  The family was back in Yuma County, Arizona as of the 1940 census.  Glenn died in Oct 1965, presumably in Arizona, but is buried in San Diego County, California.  His widow died in 1982, and his son Gordon died in 1987 at the age of 51.

Glenn was my 3rd cousin 4 times removed.

Glenn Copple Promoted to Asst DA

 

“Attorney Glen Copple is Named,” The Morning Sun (Yuma, Arizona), 2 Jan 1925, pg 1, col 6; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 13 January 2020).

 

 

 

Copples in the News – James Copple came to Logansport, Indiana

James Garfield Copple may be my 3rd cousin 5 times removed.   He was born either in Sep 1882 (according to the 1900 census) or on 8 Sep 1883 (according to the Draft Registration he filled out for World War I) or on 8 Sep 1884 (according to the Draft Registration he filled out for WWII).  

His parents were Lemon Copple (c 1837 – c 1888) and Elizabeth (Daniels) Copple, who married in 1865 in Douglas County, Kansas.  He married Jeanette Thomassen by 1916, when they were both living in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  (The article below references the fact that he was a Tulsa businessman.)  By 1920, he and his wife had 2 children, and were living in Indiana.  As of 1930, when this article was published and during the census enumeration, the family was living in Cass County, Indiana, which is where Logansport is.  Some time after 1942, he and his wife had moved to Tucson, Arizona, where he died in 1949.

James’ father, Lemon, was likely the son of Jacob Copple and Malinda Everman.  After that, it gets unclear.  There are numerous Jacob Copples and John Copples (the possible grandfather of Lemon) which are not clearly sorted out by most Ancestry.com users.  But many Ancestry trees have Lemon in Illinois or Indiana, whereas he was clearly — at least according to the Federal Census records — in Kansas.

James G Copple in LogansportIndiana

 

“How Did you Happen to Come to Logansport,” Logansport Pharos-Tribune (Logansport, Indiana), 9 May 1930, pg 4, col 4; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 27 Dec 2019).

Copples in the News – Flora’s Roses

 

Flora (Young) Copple (1869 – 1954), the wife of Claude Eugene Copple  — likely my 3rd cousin 4 times removed — of Hood River, Oregon, was apparently fond of roses.  I clipped this article thinking that her rose bushes must have been a sight to see.  But it turns out that, rather than having a green thumbs, she was in fact, skilled in paper artistry!  (Check out the third paragraph!)

The_Hood_River_Glacier_Thu__May_8__1919_

 

“Mrs. Copple’s Roses Attract Visitors,” The Hood River Glacier (Hood River, Oregon), 8 May 1919, pg 1, col 2; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 3 December 2019)

Copples in the News – James Lowry Copple dies

This is a follow-up post to a previous post about James Lowry Copple of Iowa and Illinois (which you can read here.)  He had married Mary Harmsen in 1923, and there was no mention of it being a second marriage.

In this obituary, however, mention is made of his first wife Alice (Applen) Copple, who bore him a son who died in infancy.   The obituary is in sync with the 1910 census which indicates James and Alice were married circa 1906, and that a child was born, but was no longer living.

James died in 1939, and was survived by wife Mary (Harmsen) Copple.

JamesLowryCopple_obit

 

“Funeral Services for James Copple Held in Illinois,” Iowa City Press-Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa), 6 Apr 1939, pg 9, col 4; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 28 October 2019)

Copples in the News – James Copple wed Mary Harmsen

This marriage was between James Lowry Copple, whom I believe to be my 3rd cousin 5 times removed, and his second wife Mary Harmsen in 1923 in Iowa City, Iowa.

Harmsen_Copple 1923 Nuptials

James Lowry Copple was the son of Albert and Isabella (London) Copple.  He was one of 5 known children of theirs.  He was born in 1870 in Indiana and thus was hardly “young” by 1923, although his bride (second wife) was 17 years younger.

James worked as a farmer, and married his first wife around 1906.  They had one son, who died as an infant, before 1910.  After his first wife died in 1920, James remarried in 1923 to Mary Harmsen, whose father, Garrett, was born in Holland.

JamesLowryCopple_FamilyTree

 

“Copple-Harmsen,” Iowa City Press-Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa), 25 Aug 1923, pg 17, col 3;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copples in the News — Estate of Sam Copple (1824 – 1852)

This newspaper clipping appears to be about the estate of the late Samuel Copple (c 1824 – c 1852) of Marion County, Illinois.  Samuel was one of at least 11 children born to David [Allen] Copple & Lavina Huckleberry who resided in Marion County, IL late in their lives.  David was likely the son of Jacob [Peter] Copple and [Mary] Elizabeth Garren (or Pfouts), and thus would have been a brother to my own ancestor Philip (c 1784 – 1850).

Samuel was born in Washington County, Indiana circa 1824.  Washington County, Indiana was the original destination for my Copple and Wright families; they arrived in the area circa 1809, purchasing land there before moving from Wayne County, Kentucky (their first stop after leaving the Rowan County, North Carolina area). 

Judging from the 1830 and 1840 census records, and the land patent images available at BLM’s online site, it appears the Copple family moved to Illinois when Samuel was about 15 years old, stopping in the Jefferson/Marion County area. (Both counties are adjacent to each other, Marion having been created from part of Jefferson in 1823.) [1]

Sam married Maria Railey in January 1847; they had 2 daughters: Ellen and Sarah.  Sam died at about the age of 28, and his widow married Abner Faulkner within a fairly short time.

Eli Copple is listed as the Administrator of Sam’s estate; Sam had an older brother Eli, who also lived in Marion County, Illinois.

Samuel Copple Estate Administered

“Administrator’s Notice,” Salem Weekly Advocate (Salem, Illinois), 25 Mar 1852, pg 3, col 7; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

[1] “Marion County, Illinois,” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Marion_County,_Illinois : accessed 24 October 2019).

 

Copples in the News — Thelma Irene gets married

Thelma Irene (Copple) Selsor (1910 – 1995) was born either in Missouri, or in West Frankfort, Illinois, to Gaither Calvin Copple (1878 – 1947) and Eva (Martin) Copple (b. 1888).  She was born 18 April, a few days after the official 1910 census date, but a few days before her neighborhood was enumerated.  A child named “Myrtle” was listed as aged 1/12 (presumably 1 month old) in the household. [1] Could that be Thelma?

As indicated in the article, Thelma Irene married Lawrence Marion Selsor  (1911-1972) in Jonesboro on July 24, 1942.   Thelma worked at the (local?) air base, while Lawrence was with the Works Project Administration.  They took a honeymoon to Memphis, Tennessee. 

A quick search for Thelma Selsor on Ancestry’s page for U.S. city directories (1822 – 1995)  seems to indicate that the Selsors made their home in Jonesboro, Arkansas, after they married.

I did not do enough research on Thelma to determine if she had children.  However, it appears her paternal grandparents were Levi and Malinda (Dobbs) Copple and her great-grandparents were William and Abigail (Handley) Copple.  William’s parents were both Copples, being cousins to each other, and Thelma was likely my 4th cousin 3 times removed.

Thelma Irene Gets Married

“Selsor-Copple Rites are Performed Here,” The Courier News (Blytheville, Arkansas), 31 Jul 1942, page 2, column 1; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 September 2019)

[1] 1910 U.S. census, New Madrid County, Missouri,  population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 108, Hough, page 2B, family 43, Gaither [indexed as Garther] Copple household; digital images, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/ 1910uscenindex/: accessed 18 Oct 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T624, roll 802.

Copples in the News — Estate of Philip Copple (1784 – 1850), my 5th great-granddad

This particular court notice from early 1853, Washington County, Indiana, is intriguing because I recognize the family group as the likely children and in-laws of my 5th great-granddad Philip Copple.  At the same time, there is more to research — not all the family group is listed here: why?  Certain heirs are mentioned as not being [any longer] residents of Indiana — I can document some but not all.

Philip’s likely daughter Catherine (ca. 1822 – aft 1900) married a William Sluder (c 1828 – c 1878) in Oct 1849 in Washington County, Indiana.  William’s possible father was Henry Sluder (c 1809 – c 1870).  Was the Henry C. Sluder petitioning for a deed or title bond the same man?  And just what is a title bond?

So, clearly, more to research — but here’s what I do know (below article)…

Henry Sluder vs Heirs of Philip Copple

Jacob was Philip’s eldest son, and was my 4th great grandfather.  Margaret (Copple) Sutherland was a sister of Jacob; her husband was Samuel Sutherland.  The Sutherlands lived near the Jacob Copple household near the Newton / Jasper County line in Missouri in 1850.  So, yes, they were not Indiana residents in February 1853 when this notice was published.  John Copple, a brother to Jacob and to Margaret, was also in Newton County, Missouri in 1850.    So far as I know, though, Abraham Copple, likely son of Philip, married Rosanna Hauger in 1847 in Washington County, Indiana, and resided there in 1850, next to Philip Copple [1] (whose third wife, incidentally, was Catherine Hauger).  

Abraham Copple 1850 Washington Co IND

However, since I only recently came across this article, it is possible that I have my Abraham Copples misidentified.  Surely the persons identified in the notice would have known which of their siblings was no longer living in Indiana!  (More research needed here.)  Or, Abraham could have resided a short time outside Indiana in the 1853 time frame, only to return by 1860. 

The other persons mentioned are Joshua Barr [Bare], Betsy Ann Barr [Bare], and Nancy Barr [Bare].  Joshua and Nancy’s names were already familiar to me as the children of the late Nancy (Copple) Bare, another daughter of Philip.  Nancy married in December 1830, so in February 1853, those three children could have been of age.

To summarize, the questions I have which need answering are:

  • Do I have Abraham Copple correctly identified?
  • What is a title bond?  And why was Henry Sluder fighting for one?  And, if he was indeed the father-in-law of Catherine (Copple) Sluder, why was he involved, and not his son?
  • Why weren’t the rest of the heirs involved in this?  Philip had other children living in February 1853, and Nancy (Copple) Bare was survived by additional minor children.

 

“Henry Sluder v Heirs of Phillip Copple,” The Washington Democrat (Salem, Indiana), 11 Feb 1853, pg 3, col 1; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019)

[1] 1850 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, population schedule, Posey Township, page 239 (stamped), dwelling 509, family 522, Abram [“Abren”] Copple household; digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1850usfedcenancestry/ : accessed 17 October 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication M432, roll 179.