Ancestry’s Latest Ethnicity Update

Ancestry is apparently in the process of updating ethnicity percentages yet again.  I got an email today from them, and checked it out.  The change is not particularly significant for me, but keeps getting farther from the “truth” (i.e., my maternal grandfather was a 1st-generation American, born to 2 Italian immigrants.)  One of my male cousins on that side has done the Y-500 test at FTDNA; his haplogroup (which should also have been my grandfather’s) has deep roots in the Italian peninsula.

Here’s what it was as of the last change (September 2018), when my Italian was dropped from 19% to 3%:

Ancestry Cathy Ethnicity Old

That was the big shift.  The image below shows what it is now as of today.  What IS very much in line with my family history is the southern Ireland genetic communities, such as Co. Clare, Co. Limerick and Co. Kerry.  (The Irish ethnicity is all on my paternal side.)  The Germanic Europe and Northwestern Europe which appears to include Schleswig-Holstein is also in line with my maternal roots. 

It’s just the lack of Italian heritage — which shows up on FamilyTreeDNA, MyHeritage, 23andMe, and GedMatch — is really my only quibble with Ancestry’s results.  (And it may be due to Ancestry’s customer population being heavily weighted towards persons of European ancestry who have (relatively) deep roots in North America.)

Ancestry Ethnicity Update 20191023

My mother and my brother apparently have not gotten their updates yet.  If you’ve tested at Ancestry, have you seen a recent update to your ethnicity?  If so, how did it change?

 

 

 

How I use the Shared Clustering Tool

The other day, in the Facebook user group for the Shared Clustering Tool created by Jonathan Brecher, I saw a post about how different folks use the tool.  I mentioned capturing MRCA information and aligning it to the clusters, but thought I would expound here in a blog post.

Before I begin, I’m making one basic assumption for this post — that you’ve already started playing with the Shared Clustering tool yourself. 

First of all, I only use it for Ancestry matches at this time, primarily because that’s where I have the most matches (ditto for my mom and my dad) and because Ancestry currently doesn’t provide segment information.

Secondly, although the tool offers the option of downloading match data directly from Ancestry, I do not use that feature.  Instead, I use the match and ICW (“In Common With”) files downloaded from Ancestry via DNAGedcom.com, which is, frankly, my go-to tool. 

DNAGedCom’s CSV files are my go-to files because I’m most comfortable using Excel – one of the reasons I like Shared Clustering, actually – and because that’s how I started, and I’ve kept on.   (Long story short, had I begun by using Ancestry’s Notes feature more effectively than I did, I could save myself some time, but I do it all in my DNAGedCom match file, and then update each subsequent download using VLOOKUP.)

An example of tracking on my mom’s Ancestry DNA match list (via DNAGedCom) is shown below:

Mom_DNAGedCom_MRCA

Color-coded by known MRCA.  If I’m not certain of the MRCA, based on the clustering, I add comments like “Copple kin” or “Hill?”

I upload the MRCA information to the completed Shared Clustering file via VLOOKUP since Jonathan has so nicely included the Test ID in the tool.  Usually, I will take the time to color-code the MRCA data in the Shared Clustering result file, simply so I can zoom out and easily see which cluster “belongs” to which possible MRCA.

Below you can see where I’ve zoomed out to see a fairly large clustering of my matches.  I’ve zoomed out to 10% and have highlighted 284 matches.  Per Jonathan Brecher’s Wiki, the red color indicates likely shared DNA.  The gray color indicates that, although the two matches (one in the row and one in the column) do not share DNA with each other, they likely share with a third person.  You can also see (barely) my color-coded MRCA notes on the left side of the image.

Cathy_SharedMatches_1

So, let’s zoom in a bit on this large cluster.

Below, notice that I have highlighted in green (as indicated by the yellow arrows) one of my closest matches (although she is a 4th cousin 1 removed).  She and I share a common ancestral couple:  Jacob Copple and Margaret Blalock, my 4th great-grandparents.  We also share 3 segments of DNA, and two of those segments are indicated here, in the cluster of red at the top left, and the cluster of red (circled in yellow).  Note the vertical line of red that merges into a vertical line of green — the red is showing me that she and I share DNA with the bulk of the two circled groups.

Cathy_SharedMatches_4

What does this tell us?  First it indicates two different segments of DNA, so if we go far enough back in time, it would be 2 different ancestors.   Second, she and I likely share those 2 segments of DNA.  Third, all the associated gray indicates a link between these 2 segments of DNA, so these matches are all most likely related to me via one ancestor and upstream of that ancestor.

Let’s zoom in even further and look more closely, now at my MRCA/clustering information I’ve imported from DNAGedCom.  The blue labels refer to matches who are Blalock/Blaylock descendants.  The gray labels reference a known match on Chromosome 9.

Cathy_SharedMatches_2

This would seem to point at the connection being on a segment of chromosome 9 and also relating to Margaret (Blalock) Copple.  This does not mean these matches share Margaret (Blalock) Copple as an ancestor with me, but rather one of Margaret’s own ancestors.

To put it another way, I have a clue!  These shared cluster results would seem to indicate that I need to do more research on Margaret (Blalock) Copple’s line, and connect with the matches who are Blalock descendants. And, at other DNA vendors, I should connect with matches who share the same segment on chromosome 9 to find out how or if they might be connected to a Blalock/Blaylock ancestor.

SharedClustering_Chr9

Let’s look at the second cluster, below.  This zoomed-in, partial view show matches who potentially share a segment on chromosome 13 with me.  Based on their Ancestry tree information, there are some who share Jacob Copple and Margaret Blalock as common ancestors with me (just one shown here).

SharedClustering_Chr13

Other matches in this cluster have no Copple or Blalock at all in their tree.  Their trees could be incomplete or incorrect, of course (as could mine!)  OR, their trees could be indicating a shared ancestor further “upstream” (meaning, a possible ancestor of Margaret (Blalock) Copple.  To that end, I’ve noted where there are Hemphill and Hungate ancestors in my matches’ trees.

These Hemphill and Hungate families, according to the Ancestry trees of my matches, hailed from Kentucky (where Margaret Blalock was born ca. 1810) and a branch of the Hungate family ended up in Washington County, Indiana in the 1810’s – 1830’s.  This is the same county Margaret lived in during the same time frame.  Although not definitive, it’s worth noting as a potential clue.

In summary, because the two groups are related (as indicated by all the gray associated with them), both DNA segments the groupings indicate are more likely to have been inherited by me from Margaret (Blalock) Copple (and, ultimately, her ancestors) rather than from her husband Jacob Copple.

Here’s another example of a cluster on my Copple line, where you can quickly see, from the teal color on the left-hand side, that these matches share an MRCA.  In fact, I use the teal to indicate more than one generation of Copple ancestors (all also ancestors of Jacob Copple who married Margaret Blalock).

SharedClustering_COPPLE

The last example is a line from my dad’s side.  As with the Copple and Blalock lines from my mother’s side, this paternal line is rooted in the United States from at least 1800 if not decades before that. 

The bulk of these DNA matches share my third great-grandparents, Anderson Lamburth and Ermine Farley (or Farnham).  However, they are clearly grouped in two clusters, so that one set may share Lamburth DNA and another set Farley DNA, or “upstream” (as in Anderson’s mother and Anderson’s father, or Ermine’s two parents).

Most intriguing is the linking between the two clusters.  Not just the general gray, but the vertical red lines indicated by the blue arrow.  I need to look more closely at these two matches — their names will be in the column headers (not shown here for privacy reasons). 

One, they likely share 2 DNA segments with me.  Two, they clearly share DNA with the small cluster on the upper left, as well as the larger cluster on the lower right.  AND the folks in the middle who are only indirectly related (indicated by gray) to the two obvious clusters.

SharedClustering_LAMBURTH

One other item to note in this cluster.  Some of the MRCAs are not highlighted in yellow.  That’s legit; referenced is the granddaughter of Anderson & Ermine, Mary (Lamburth) Dempsey, who was my great-grandma and her husband William. Clearly, the segment shared here relates to Mary rather than William.

If you use the Shared Clustering tool to visualize your Ancestry DNA matches, do you use any visualization aids to assign clusters to ancestors?  Perhaps you make better use of the Notes field than I do?

 

Cite/link to this post: Cathy M. Dempsey, “How I use the Shared Clustering Tool,Genes and Roots, posted 21 Oct 2019 (https://genesandroots.com : accessed (date)).

 

 

Copples in the News – Maggie gets married

Margaret “Maggie” Copple (1861 – 1929) was the daughter of Samuel Copple and Mary Ann Rhoades.  Mary Ann herself had Copple blood, being the daughter of David D Rhoades and Celia Copple.  She is related to me on 3 lines: her maternal grandmother’s line (Copple), her father’s paternal grandfather’s line (Copple, obviously) and her father’s paternal grandmother’s line (Wright).

She and her family moved to Mendocino County, California during the 1870s, and married Samuel Duncan in Nov 1881 in Cloverdale, Sonoma County, California.  They would have 5 children, per the 1900 Federal Census, but only two would outlive Maggie.

Copple-Duncan

“Local Items,” Cloverdale Reveille (Cloverdale, California), 26 Nov 1881, pg 5, col 2;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 21 Sept 2019)

1900 U.S. census, Mendocino County, California, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 75, Sanel, page 3, dwelling 51, Samuel Duncan household; digital images, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1900usfedcen/: accessed 23 Sep 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T623, roll 93.

 

 

Copples in the News — A Marriage in Spokane, Washington

My extended Copple family apparently reached nearly every Western state, including California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Idaho and Arizona.  This article is about the upcoming wedding of Edward Clifton Copple (c 1879 – 1935) and his bride Olive Isham (1872 – 1956).

A little searching on Ancestry.com points to Edward Copple being the son of Abraham A and Marguerite Mahala (Fimple) Copple.  Edward’s great-grandparents were Jacob [Peter] Copple (c 1757 – 1821) and [Mary?] Elizabeth Garren [or Pfoutz], who are my 6th great-grandparents.

EdwardCliftonCopple_Marriage

“Michigan Girl Spokane Bride,” Spokane Chronicle (Washington) 11 May 1909, pg 6, col 7;
Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019)

Copples in the News — Bride of a Day goes to Prison

This story, apparently taking place in Logansport, Cass County, Indiana, is so lurid it doesn’t need an introduction.

But I did do some light searching to find out more about whether these people might be related to my own Copple line… more below.

Jessie Mary Copple Killed

Mrs. Mary [sic] Copple was apparently Junie May Harper born circa 1884, and married to a Charles Copple, born in Aug 1884 or 1885 in Missouri.  They had two girls, and had been married about 6 years at the time of her murder.  Charles was, over the years, alternately listed as mulatto or as black in the federal censuses.  Junie May (Harper) Copple was listed as white.

 

“Bride of a Day is Sent to Prison,” Spokane Chronicle (Spokane, Washington) 7 Dec 1912, pg 13, col 3; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 Sep 2019)

1910 U.S. census, Cass County, Indiana, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 26, Logansport Ward 3, page 5A, dwelling 512, Charles Copple household; digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1910uscenindex/ : accessed 22 Sep 2019); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication M624, roll 342.

Lucas County, Ohio, Charles Copple – Olive Moore, 2 July 1923; “Ohio, County Marriage Records, 1774-1993,” Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/fsmarriageohio/ : accessed 21 Sep 2019) > Lucas > 1920-1926 > img 70.

 

 

 

Richard Wright (c 1726 – c 1784) – Where there’s a Will: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Transcription of probated will of Richard Wright, Sr., my 7th-great grandfather.

From the office of Clerk Superior Court, Rowan County, Salisbury, North Carolina, in Will Book C, page 207.  This particular copy is from “North Carolina Probate Records, 1735-1970,” digital images. FamilySearch (http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2015) > imgs 158-159; citing County courthouses, North Carolina.

(transcribed by Cathy Dempsey 12/29/2015; bolding, italicization and brackets are mine)

“In the name of God Amen.  I, Richard WRIGHT Senr. of the County of Rowan & State of North Carolina being through the abundant mercy and goodness of God tho weak in body Yet of a sound and perfect understanding & Memory do constitute this my last Will and Testament, and desire it may be Received by all as such as for my burial I desire it to be decent without pomp or State at the discretion of my dear Wife and as to my worldly Estate I will and positively order that all my debts be paid. I give and bequeath to my son Benjamin Two hundred Acres of land lying on the Waters of deep River in Randolph County, Including the plantation whereon he used to live & I give to my son Peter Twenty Shillings & I give to my Sons Richard & William an Entry of land containing 226 Acres lying in Randolph County on the Waters of Uary to be divided equally at their own discretion. I give to my son Amus One hundred Acres of land including the house wherein he now lives & the price of a new Saddle and Bridle & I likewise give to my son William a feather Bed and furniture & and I give to my son Evins a milch cow a feather bed and furniture and the price of a good saddle and Bridle. [This line bequeathing Evans is included in the copy existing at NC Archives, but NOT in the copy which Familysearch.org has.] I give to my son John  a cow and Calf or the Value thereof in Gold or Silver & I give to my son Philburd a Horse Bridle and Saddle and a Cow and feather Bed and furniture at the age of Twenty One or at his Mothers discretion and this plantation where I now live at his Mothers decease or Marriage and I give to my dear and loving Wife Two hundred Acres of land lying on deep River where I formerly used to live in Randolph County to sell at her discretion and likewise all my moveable property that I possess and if she Marrys two thirds of the Estate is to be divided equal amongst the Children and if she dies without marrying the prinsable [principal] Estate is to be divided equal amongst the all my Children. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this third day of September; Anno Dom: 1784

Witness present
 Wm X Wright His Mark                         Richard R WRIGHT (Seal)  His Mark
Evins X Wright His Mark 
Richard Wright
James MORGAN Junr.
Questions  12/29/2015

Benjamin is given 200 acres near Deep River in Randolph County – when does he sell or bequeath this land?  He dies in Marion County, Indiana, so there should be a deed transferring the land to a child, or a will, or a sale to someone else.

Why does Peter only get 20 shillings?
Note on 23 Sep 2019:  On 29 Jul 1783 Richard Wright assigned to “my son Peter” one of his own land grants for 200 acres.[1]

[1]“North Carolina, Land Grant Files, 1693–1960,” database with images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 Sept 2019) > Randolph > 1-257 > image 1141 of 1343.

226 acres goes to Richard C Wright and his brother William.  What happens to this land?  Richard remains in the area to the end of his life, and Richard ends up living in Davidson County (formed from Rowan in 1822).  So to whom does he sell his share of the 226 acres? What about William?
Note on 23 Sep 2019:  226 acres of land in Randolph County is assigned to William Summers (a possible brother of Rebecca Summers, who married Evans Wright, one of Richard’s sons) by William Wright in 1787.  Could this be the same land as above? See:  https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/60621/44173_355605-00907/81611?

Amos is living on 100 acres at the time of the will, which is bequeathed him by his father.  Where is he living?  In Rowan?  Or in Randolph?

Richard’s wife gets 200 acres of Richard’s land in Randolph County where he used to live.  Which land is that?  Is it part of the 400 acres he used to have by Deep River?  When is it sold or transferred to other members of the family?  Does Richard’s wife have a will after he dies?

Richard’s son Philburd is given the land where Richard and his wife are currently living (in 1784) when Richard’s wife dies or remarries.  When does Philburd get this land, and what happens to it in the future?   [check Rowan County indexes for Philburd Wright grantee and grantor.  He would turn 21 in 1789.]

Copples in the News – A 50th Anniversary

Today’s post about Copples in the news is a decidedly happy one.  It is about the upcoming family reunion to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Simpson Jasper Copple (1842-1933) and his wife Alice Flora (Williamson) Copple (1847-1933). 

Simpson’s parents were Andrew Charles Copple (1814-1881) of Indiana and Christina (Fine) Copple of North Carolina.  Andrew Charles was the grandson of Jacob [Peter] Copple and M.E. Garren, my 6th-great grandparents, so Simpson is my late 2nd cousin 5 times removed.

Simpson and Alice were both natives of Illinois, and they were married on 15 June 1868 in Marion County, Illinois.  

Three of their sons are named in the article, but during Simpson and Alice’s long marriage, they raised 9 children.   The family moved from Illinois to Hood River, Oregon around 1885, and it was in Oregon that the youngest two children were born.   

SimpsonCopple_50th_Anniversary

 

“Will Have Family Reunion,” The Semi-Weekly Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington) 4 Jun 1918, pg 7, col 3; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

Copples in the News — Death of a 4 year old girl

I’m stealing a post idea… Randy Seaver’s “Seavers in the News“weekly posts on his blog Genea-Musings, and will start doing a series on Copples in the news.  Copple is one of my ancestral surnames — that of one of my 2nd great-grandmothers, specifically my maternal grandmother’s own maternal grandmother (Libby Copple 1861-1906).

This brief obituary is about a 5 year old (sic) girl named Margaret Bertha Copple, the daughter of Enos Eli and Bertha (Storch) Copple, who lived in Omak, Okanogan County, Washington.

Margaret was born in 1906, and died on 30 August 1910, and therefore was only 4 when she died.  The cause of her death — “infantile paralysis” is, presumably, polio, (but I could be wrong).  Her three year old brother was most likely Harold Enos Copple, who apparently survived and lived to a ripe old age.

Margaret’s father Enos Eli Copple was a native of Centralia, Marion County, Illinois, where a number of my Copple and Wright ancestors settled, moving west from southern Indiana circa 1850.

Margaret was my 4th cousin 3 times removed; our Most Recent Common Ancestors are Jacob [Peter] Copple (c 1757 – 1821) and his wife [Mary] Elizabeth Garren (or Pfoutz?), natives of Rowan County, North Carolina, who moved to Indiana around 1810.

Margaret Bertha Copple died young

“Brief City News,” The Wenatchee Daily World (Washington), 6 Sep 1910, p. 8, col. 3, para. 19; Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 September 2019).

Throwback Thursdays #tbt #wedding – My Parents

These photos were taken on my parents’ wedding day in 1957, at the home of my maternal grandfather.  The first one, clearly discolored due to its age and the nature of the film, is of my dad and mom, and their attendants.  Dad’s best man, George Francis McGrath (1934-1960), is on the far left.  Mom’s maid-of-honor, in blue (though it’s not obvious in this photo!), was her friend Jane (Sommerfeld) Stroth (1934-2011).  Mom and Jane met in nursing school; Jane would marry Jan Sroth the following year.

15Jun1957_MomWedding1

Dad and George were best friends, having gone to high school together — and possibly college (?).    George later joined the military and was doing training exercises at NAS Corpus Christi — flying — when his plane crashed and he died in January 1960.  My grandfather, who was informed, chose not to tell my dad (who was studying for his doctorate up in Michigan) because Grandpa didn’t want Dad to take time away from his studies to come back to San Francisco for the funeral.   (Not cool, Gramps!  Not cool at all.)

In the photo below, it’s a bit more obvious that Jane was wearing blue — even so, the color has faded significantly since I was a child.  It used to be evident that she wore a forget-me-not blue — with matching blue shoes.

MomWeddingDay_withGrandpa

This last picture was one I had printed from a slide about 30 years ago, so the color is richer, but still fading.  I don’t know everybody in the picture, but can name some folks:

15Jun1957_MomWedding5

From left to right — the first 3 people I don’t know.  Wearing a navy blue dress is my grand-aunt Anita (Colbert) Foley (Dad’s maternal aunt).  Behind her is her husband “Bud” Foley.  Next to them are my dad’s parents Cassius Dempsey and Margaret (Colbert) Dempsey.  Then, my dad and my mom.  On my mom’s left, wearing a hat and flowered dress is my dad’s sister Peggy.  Next to her, in the belted dress, is my mom’s cousin Rita Diamantine.  Behind Rita to her left are maid-of-honor Jane (Sommerfeld) Stroth and best man George McGrath.

What strikes me in going through these photos is how casual it all was.  The reception is my grandparents’ backyard.  Sandwiches, punch, wedding cake, and coffee was all that was on the menu.  Contrast that today with, say, the destination wedding!  Times change, don’t they?